Here’s a list of some music industry job titles & roles. Some obvious, some not. Some just titles but whatever. Maybe you’ll find the answer your looking for, maybe you won’t.

  • Singer / Vocalist – Singers for bands, wedding bands, and events
  • Guitarist – Guitar players jobs and guitarist employment
  • Guitar Jobs – Guitar sales and guitar related employment in music equipment stores
  • Instrumentalist – Musicians needed for orchestras, symphonies, and on stage performances
  • Drummer – Drum player jobs and drum sales occupations
  • Keyboardist – Keyboard musicians employment in bands and for recording companies
  • Pianist – Piano players jobs and employment for symphonies, concerts, and other venues
  • Organist – Church organists and wedding organists for special occasions and regular employment
  • Accompanist – Various musician jobs for events and bands
  • Musician – Instrumentalist jobs for session work, bands, and music related projects
  • Choir Musician – Choir and chorus vocalists and singers for organizations and churches
  • Music Conductor – Orchestra and band conductors for schools and bands
  • Choral Conductor – Band and orchestra conductors for educational institutions and bands
  • Organ Player – Church organist and religious music jobs
  • Cantor – Church and Worship Organists
  • Church Organist – Church organ player jobs
  • Church Musician – Church singers, folk guitarists, and various church musician jobs
  • Orchestra – General orchestra musicians and conductors
  • Orchestra Musician – Various orchestra positions including violinists, cellists, and more
  • Cruise Music – Cruise ship entertainment and cruise musicians
  • Cruise Musician – Cruise ship band and musician jobs for those willing to travel
  • Wedding Music Jobs – Wedding Bands and wedding musicians for that special occasion
  • Opera – Opera singers and general opera employment
  • Clarinet / Flute / Trumpet / Sax / Violin / Cello – Various orchestra and symphony jobs
  • Music Manager – Management jobs within the music industry. Supervise and coordinate projects in the music business
  • Touring Manager – Manage band tours or musician gigs for traveling and touring acts
  • Sound Technician / Sound Tech / Theater Sound – Run PA sound for bands, events, and corporate meetings
  • Lighting Technician / Theater Lighting – Run professional lighting for events, bands, and corporate conferences
  • Stage Manager – Stage set up and overall management of an event stage for bands, events, and performances
  • Stage Technician – Stage set up positions for touring and regional performances
  • Stage Rigger – Work with complicated stage set ups and rigging for performances
  • Publicist – Artist, band, and act marketing and promotions.  Get publicity through a variety of mediums.
  • Tour Coordinator – Coordinate various touring responsibilities for artists, bands, and acts
  • Tour Promoter – Promote, market, and coordinate show activities for bands, performers, and events
  • Concert Promoter – Promote upcoming concerts for bands, musicians, comedians, and traveling performances
  • Concert Promotion – Marketing and promotion of upcoming concerts and events
  • Event Production – Produce an event for businesses in a variety of facets
  • Event Manager – Oversee, supervise, and coordinate staff and event responsibilities
  • Event Planner – Coordinate and run events for companies and corporations
  • Wedding Planner – Plan that special day for the bride and groom including weddings, receptions, and more
  • Tradeshow Planner – Coordinate tradeshow events in specific regions or areas
  • Rigger – Stage Rigging positions for concerts, performances, and acts
  • Event Technology – Technical sound and lighting jobs for events, musicians, bands, and conferences
  • Audio Engineer – Sound engineering jobs to ensure proper audio for events and concerts
  • Live Sound – Sound technicians to run PA sound systems for events and bands
  • Sound Design – Sound positions for events, conferences, and musicians
  • Sound Operator – Run sound for events, musicians, and bands
  • Lighting Designer – Develop lighting shows for large events and concerts
  • Lighting – Various lighting jobs for events
  • Pro Audio – Sound for events and corporate gatherings and could include recording jobs
  • Audio Mixer – Mix sound for music production, concerts, and events
  • Audio Tech – Technician jobs in audio, video, movies, and websites
  • Stage Hand – Stage help jobs including cleaning, talent coordination, and equipment maintenance
  • Tour Manager – Supervise various aspects of a tour including bands, back stage, riders, food services and more
  • Production Manager – Production supervision employment for stage and performances
  • Production Assistant – Assist production managers and technicians with activities coordination and staff
  • Wardrobe – Wardrobe and makeup for bands, acts, actors, actresses, and event performers
  • Music Producer – Produce various aspects of music recordings and productions of sound
  • Recording Jobs – Record bands, musicians, and artists with professional equipment and a knowledgeable skill set
  • Mastering – Finishing post production for music projects, CD’s, albums, and digital distribution
  • Music Engineering – Engineer sounds for bands, performers, and productions
  • Digital Audio Editor – Audio editing jobs for music projects, bands, TV, movies, and video
  • Programmer – Programing in recording using software like Pro Tools, Cubase, and others
  • Music Director – Direct music projects at schools, music companies, and recording studios
  • Songwriter – Write songs for bands, musicians, shows, and singer songwriters
  • Music Editor – Edit music for music projects, CD’s, MP3’s, and albums
  • Music Publisher – Publish music for corporations who sell recorded music
  • Music Publication – Publisher jobs in the music industry
  • Editor – Various editor employment in the music business and other industries
  • Journalist – Writers for entertainment newspapers, general news, magazines, and websites
  • Music Journalist – Writer jobs for music magazines and music websites
  • Composer – Compose music for scores and scripts in movies, TV, websites, video, and more
  • Sound Mixer – Mix sound in the music industry for recording studios and live sound projects
  • Indie Music Jobs – Variety of jobs within the indie music profession
  • Music Careers – Various music careers including all facets of the music industry
  • Booking Agents – Entertainment Agents that book bands and entertainment for venues
  • Music Agents – Entertainment bureau and booking agent employment
  • Entertainment Jobs – All entertainment employment positions for events, comedy, and music
  • Music Promotion / Promoter – Promote music projects and promotion of live band gigs and shows
  • Music Business Jobs – Various music industry jobs for major record companies and others
  • Music Business Attorney – Music Law positions that helps bands and musicians with legal matters
  • Music Business Manager – Management jobs in music and for live entertainment
  • Music Supervisor – Oversee music projects for record companies and other music related businesses
  • Music Director – Direct music projects in movies, film, TV, website, and video
  • Music Marketing – Music promotion employment in order to get business for bands and musicians
  • Tour Marketing – Promoting a tour, concert, or gig for major talent and bands
  • Digital Music Jobs – Digital recording and digital production jobs
  • Digital Music Marketing – Digital marketing and promotions within the music industry
  • Online Music Jobs – Online band, music, and artist promotion
  • Performing Arts – Dancers and theater jobs for major performances on stage and more
  • Music Instrument Sales – Guitar, Drum, and band instrument sales jobs at music stores
  • Guitar Sales Jobs – Sell new and used guitars in music and guitar related stores
  • Music Management – Management jobs in music companies and music business management jobs
  • Music Advertising – Print, online, and phone related advertising jobs in music
  • Orchestra Conductor – Conduct orchestras in schools, colleges, and more
  • Copyright Jobs – Copyright related jobs in the music industry
  • Record Label – Major record label jobs in a variety of fields including related occupations, finance, and management
  • Music Licensing Jobs – License music from bands and for companies who may need music for projects
  • Music Production – Produce music for bands and solo artists in general
  • Royalty Analyst / Royalty Accountant – Royalty Employment in the music industry
  • Music Marketing – Market and promote music for music companies and bands
  • Entertainment Marketing – Promote upcoming events for venues and artists
  • A&R (Artist & Repertoire) – Work with Artists in various aspects of their careers
  • Music Therapist – Therapy related music jobs.  Using music as treatment for patient conditions
  • Speech Therapist / Voice Therapist – Vocal therapy and speech therapy for people
  • Music Store Jobs – Musical instrument sales for various music related stores
  • Record Store Jobs – Help customers with music knowledge and to help them find the music they need
  • Concert Jobs – Concert venue jobs in food vending, security, parking assistance, and more
  • Band Website Jobs – Band website optimization and website creation employment
  • Music Website – Music related website employment entertainment
  • Music Web Producer – Produce web music and songs for websites and internet activities
  • Record Label Website – Record label online employment for website development and more
  • Cruise Events – Cruise ship entertainment employment including bands, entertainers, and comedians
  • Cruise Director – Director of activities for cruise ships
  • Cruise Ship Jobs – All cruise related employment activities
  • Cruise Staff – General service postions on cruise lines
  • Cruise Entertainment – Entertainment jobs on a variety of cruise ships and lines
  • Band Openings – Job openings for musicians and bands in a variety of venues
  • Music Business Management – Manage a music related business and supervise staff and activities
  • Recording Arts – Variety of careers within recording studios and movie editing
  • Recording Intern – Intern at a recording studio
  • Recording Technician – Technical aspects of music and video recoring
  • Recording Engineer – Engineering a recording session
  • Recording Associate – Learn the different aspects of recording as an associate
  • Music Business Analyst – Financial analysis of all facets of the music industry
  • Music Coordinator – Coordinate projects for music recordings, movies, video, and websites
  • Music Teacher – Music educators of students in schools and colleges
  • Music Instructor – Music instruction in schools and private sector music instruction
  • Music Education – Music teachers for schools and colleges
  • Music Theory – Teach music theory in schools and educational institutes
  • Professor Of Music – Music professor employment for educational facilities
  • Assistant Professor Of Music – Assistant to music professors who teach in educational arenas
  • Chorus Teacher – Choir, chorus, and vocal teaching related employment
  • Orchestra Teacher – Orchestra educational employment in schools and music education
  • Instrumental Teacher – Musical instrument instruction for guitar, piano, woodwinds, brass instruments and more
  • Vocal Teacher / Vocal Instructor – Teaching singers appropriate techniques and range exercises
  • Voice Teacher – Various vocal related jobs including personal instructions and group instruction employment
  • Band Teacher / Band Director – Leading a band for schools and marching band leaders
  • Marching Band Director – Lead a marching band for high schools and educational facilities
  • Guitar Teacher / Guitar Lessons – Guitar instruction jobs that may deal with kids, students, and adults
  • Bass Guitar Teacher – Bass guitar instruction jobs and employment
  • Strings Teacher – Teach cello, violin, bass, and other string instrument instruction
  • Piano Teacher – Piano instruction jobs in various venues, schools, universities, and the private sector
  • Choir Director – Jobs in leading and teaching choirs in churches and schools
  • Guitar Tutor – Guitar teaching employment
  • Music Tutor – Music instruction jobs that help students
  • Voice Tutor – Vocal tutor jobs that help students in singing style and vocal range
  • Music Intern – Intern for a music company or music organization
  • Music Internship – Intern jobs in the music industry
  • Arts Education – Art teacher positions in schools, colleges, and universities
  • Musical Instrument Repairer / Restoration – Repair various musical instruments
  • Guitar Repair Tech – Guitar doctor repair work.  Refrets, guitar pickup installation, & fixing guitar neck cracks
  • Piano Repair / Piano Tuner – Piano tuning employment and jobs
  • Musical Instrument Designer – Design musical instrument for music instrument manufacturers
  • Disc Jockey / DJ – Play music for local radio stations
  • Radio Announcer – Announcer jobs in radio
  • Radio Related Jobs – Various radio related jobs including internships, DJ’s, and sports casters
  • Broadcaster – Broadcaster jobs in TV and Radio
  • Reporter – Various news and sports reporters in TV, newspapers, and online
  • Anchor – TV news, sports, and weather anchors
  • Sports Anchor – Sports reporting jobs
  • TV / Television Related Jobs – Various jobs in the television industry
  • Photographer – Photography jobs in various industries
  • Camera Operator – Operate cameras for film, TV, and online projects
  • Casting Director – Choose the proper cast for film and TV sets and shows
  • Writer – Writer jobs in TV, Music, and Film
  • Audio Producer – Audio production jobs in music and film
  • Producer / Movie / TV Producer – Produce TV shows and Movies
  • Royalty Analyst / Royalty Accounting – Royalty jobs in the music industry
  • Videographer – Shoot video for various projects including weddings
  • Video Producer – Produce video for TV, film, and online projects
  • Music Editorial – Critique various music projects, bands, and live gigs
  • Actor – Act in TV shows, movies, commercials, and online projects
  • Dancer – Dancers needed for various projects and companies
  • Music Airplay – Musical airplay employment
  • Social Media – Variety of social media related jobs
MORE SPECIFIC LIST OF ROLES & TITLES

An A&R Assistant can be responsible for supporting any and all A&R administrative tasks. Specific responsibilities of this position often include office duties, helping to scout new bands, artists, and music, as well as attending shows and acting as a liaison between the A&R rep and the record label. This position must often maintain and develop relationships directly with artists, scout and research new artists, songwriters, and producers, review demo submissions, cover shows, coordinate detailed bi-weekly A&R research reports and carry out other scouting projects.

The Artist & Repertoire (A&R) Director runs the department responsible for finding and signing new music talent. They are responsible for the budget of the department, managing the staff, hiring new staff and sometimes acting as A&R manager for larger acts. They are responsible for managing the A&R coordinators and other A&R staff.

An A&R Director needs a thorough understanding of music and the contemporary music scene. They need to know how music works and how albums are recorded and produced. Decisions must be based on sound knowledge, research and understanding of the music. It is helpful to have a good understanding of a variety of genres, for example classical, contemporary, rock, pop, and jazz. They also need excellent judgment to make decisions about the likelihood of commercial success, and the negotiating skills to ensure they get the best deal for the record company while supporting the artists’ ambitions.

A&R Managers are creative people with good business skills and a solid understanding of the music marketplace. It is not enough to like the music, an A&R Manager needs an excellent knowledge of the contemporary music scene and to understand what sells.

The main job is picking acts that will be successful and then working with the act to find the right producers and writers. The process is very much a nurturing one to ensure the band or solo artist impacts at the right time with the right material.

A&R (Artist & Repertoire) was developed when it was rare for artists to write their own material. A&R in those days was concerned with matching artists with songwriters. Nowadays A&R is responsible for scouting new talent, signing it to a label and then overseeing all aspects of the process that leads up to the delivery of all finished recordings. As well as scouting and signing singers and musicians an A&R Scout will often manage the recording process and be concerned with the development of artists as they grow and mature.

The main job of an A&R Scout (also known as A&R Rep or Talent Scout), is keeping up with the new trends and new artists in the music industry as they emerge, and recommending them to A&R Managers. They need an excellent understanding of the contemporary music scene. A large part of the job is reading trade papers, music magazines and websites. Blogs and social networking sites are a very important part of the process as they are the most organic source of information in spotting trends.

The A&R Scout will also spend a lot of time listening to music and attending numerous gigs, visiting clubs, going to showcases, listening to tapes and demo recordings, and watching videos of performing acts. They may also be responsible for helping find songs for the artists signed to the record label.

An A&R Scout works long hours and may start off not being paid. As they gain experience and a good track record they may be employed by a record label. They are often musicians themselves and may take on the A&R role for their own music or band. As technology changes there are different avenues for reaching new audiences. Attracting the attention of record labels and reaching fans directly is a role musicians are taking on for themselves, rather than relying on an A&R Scout from an established record label.

Many A&R Scouts start by being interested in music or playing in a band. They use the networks they make as musicians to go from the industry’s creative side to the business side. Being involved in the music industry in any capacity can be very important in developing a career in A&R. Becoming involved in college radio stations, campus concert promotions, record reviewing or even working at a retail music outlet are all good work experience. Working in a studio or working in the post room of a label, or anything that keeps you near the industry, can be very helpful.

A&R is a job that requires going out at night to clubs to scout talent, interact with musical artists, and manage a creative process, so it is considered a glamorous occupation. Competition for jobs in A&R is so intense, many aspiring music industry professionals do not begin their careers in A&R. Rather, they get their foot in the door by working in the mailroom or as an executive assistant. They may start in a different department of a record label such as marketing, merchandising, or radio. Most A&R Scouts will need to have another source of income as the work is badly paid. There is so much competition for A&R work that many people are prepared to work for nothing to get a foot in the door. It is possible to earn a good income and in exceptional cases, if you are lucky enough to scout musicians who become very successful, to earn a lot of money.

An Accompanist is usually somebody who supports a singer, choir or an instrumentalist, by playing a musical accompaniment. There are many types of Accompanist. An Accompanist is often, but not always, a pianist. They may provide musical accompaniment to silent films, dance classes, choirs, or other musicians including ensembles, bands and individual musicians. A singing teacher who plays the piano for their pupil while they are singing is providing accompaniment just as a band or full orchestra do, when they and a singer performs a song.

An Accompanist is often required to provide musical accompaniment at exams, recitals, auditions and competitions. A singer can hire an Accompanist for an individual performance or series of shows if no other accompaniment is available, so the Accompanist needs to be a bit of a juggler! As well as sight reading the music, they have to listen to the singers intonation and phrasing in order to adapt their playing to each singers unique style of performing.

Any instrument can be used to accompany the voice — including other voices. The most usual combinations are piano and voice, guitar and voice, organ and voices (choral), but other combinations like violin and voice, saxophone and voice or percussion and voice can be equally successful.

Being an Accompanist can be particularly rewarding when they and the singer or other musicians have the opportunity to collaborate and to build a rapport. Working together on an arrangement by rehearsing and discussing ideas allows both parties to produce a well thought out and exciting program of music. Sometimes Accompanists are referred to by the title collaborative artist or collaborative pianist, which reflects the growing appreciation of the nature of the role. A number of classical pianists have become famous as Accompanists rather than soloists.

The term Accompanist is also used to refer to a musician who is used during an audition or rehearsal for a theater production or other performance to stand in for the actual musician or musicians who will perform on the night.

Musicians who work as Accompanists are usually self employed. Many have other work to supplement their income, often as musicians or teachers, or in other roles in the music industry. An Accompanist needs to have a high level of musical proficiency, and to be flexible and sensitive to the style and needs of the musicians or artists they are working with. If they are working collaboratively with other musicians they also need creative skills.

An Account Executive in the music industry may work in PR, Marketing or Sales. They are employed directly either by a music company, or by an agency specialising in the music or entertainment industry. They will usually be responsible for a specific client of the agency or company, or a specific brand or company product. In the music industry this may be a band or solo artist, or a record label. The Account Executive will often be responsible for a portfolio of clients or brands.

The work is very competitive and Account Executives may work with some of the leading names in entertainment and music. Experience is as important as professional qualifications and an Account Executive who can demonstrate a good record of success in marketing and sales will be highly valued. There are also a number of professional qualifications available which are valuable for developing skills and keeping in touch with the latest thinking. Remuneration is often in the form of a basic salary with commission or performance related pay on top. Success is very much measured in terms of specific outcomes such as numbers of sales, or reaching a new target audience of music buyers.

An Account Executive may be required to manage a range of music from a classical music label, to online pop projects. They are required to be knowledgeable about the music market and keep up to date with trends and changes. They will usually need experience in a variety of media, such as specialised music press, general and lifestyle press and digital media, with the position going to the individual most able to demonstrate the potential of this experience.

As well as music industry knowledge an Account Executive will need high energy levels, a proactive approach and the ability to work under pressure are attributes we’re looking for.

An Account Manager in the music industry is more senior than an account executive. They will make more strategic business decisions. They may be responsible for managing a team of account executives.

Like account executives, an Account Manager may work in PR, marketing or sales. They are employed directly either by a music company, or by an agency specializing in the music or entertainment industry. They will usually be responsible for a specific client of the agency or company, or a specific brand or company product as well as managing a team of staff. In the music industry they may be responsible for a band or solo artist, a record label or perhaps an agency, publication, music TV or digital music service. The Account Manager will likely be responsible for a portfolio of clients or brands.

The work is very competitive and Account Managers may work with some of the leading names in entertainment and music. Experience is as important as professional qualifications, and an Account Manager who can demonstrate a good record of success in brand management, marketing and sales will be highly valued. There are also a number of professional qualifications available which are valuable for developing skills, and keeping in touch with the latest ideas and technology. Salary is often in the form of a basic salary with commission or performance related pay on top. Success is very much measured in terms of specific outcomes such as numbers of sales, or reaching a new target audience of music buyers.

An Account Manager may be required to manage a range of music products, from a classical music label to online pop projects. They are required to be knowledgeable about the music market and keep up to date with trends and changes. They will usually need experience in a variety of digital media and music technology, with the position going to the individual with the most applicable experience.

In addition to music industry knowledge/experience an Account Manager will need high energy levels, a proactive approach and the ability to work under pressure. These are attributes employers are looking for in an authority figure or financial decision-maker who signs off on the agreements made within a music industry organization or related company.

A Qualified Accountant in the music industry is a chartered Accountant with financial expertise within a music industry organization, record label or related music company. Professional qualifications in accountancy are essential for this role. An Accountant may be employed in different roles — as a management Accountant, as a specialized Account in a particular field or as an auditor. They will work on behalf of distributors, artists, writers, copyright societies and record companies.

Some Accountants specialize in copyright, royalties or licensing. They may be employed by a music or music related company or they may work for a firm of accounts that specializes in the music industry. Some Accountants work independently or have their own practice.

A music specialized Accountant’s job may involve undertaking audits of record company agreements on behalf of USA and overseas based artists, or audits of record companies on behalf of copyright societies. They may be employed by the record company, or by the artist themselves. Music industry specialized Accountants may also be employed either permanently or on a contract basis by companies such as radio stations, or commercial TV.

A management Accountant in the music industry will be responsible for a company’s financial affairs, making sure accurate records are kept and there is appropriate financial information needed to make business decisions, making sure the company’s finances comply with legal requirements. Their tasks will include: monthly financial reporting, support for forecasting and budgeting, reconciling balance sheets — including advances and royalties payable schedules, preparing statutory financial statements and managing payments are expenditure related to royalties and copyright. Knowledge of the music business will be an asset for any Accountant working within the music industry and experience of working with music industry clients may be required, especially for senior posts.

Accountants may also specialize in forensic Accounting, which integrates Accounting with IT and investigative skills to help lawyers, insurance companies and other clients to resolve disputes.

Some Qualified Accountants have a role as a business analyst, supporting senior managers by providing them with the financial information they need to develop the business and make the right strategic decisions. In this role it is essential to understand the music industry and to have a good understanding of the music business internationally. An Accountant working in this field may work on large record deals and advise on the structure of record company operations.

The job description for an Accounts/Finance Assistant is defined by requiring this person to be responsible for departmental billings, processing both accounts payable and accounts receivable, preparing monthly and annual financial projections and reports, and any other job related tasks assigned by their superiors.

An Accounts/Finance Assistant working in the Royalties department is generally responsible for assisting in ensuring that licensing deals are tracked and that payments are timely and in accordance with agreements. This position is responsible for the processing of artist royalties related to these agreements.

Responsibilities may include processing payments, voids and reissues, releasing withheld monies, setting up charges, placing withholds, and legal department correspondence.

An acting coach trains and works with aspiring actors and actresses to help them elevate their acting skill set.

An actor (alternatively actress for a female) is a person portraying a character in a dramatic or comic production; she or he performs in: film, television, theatre, or radio

Working as an Administrative Assistant in the music industry can either be a satisfying job in its own right, or an excellent way to start a career in media or music. An Administrative Assistant role can be many things, depending on the size, nature and culture of the organization. If you are looking for a varied role with the opportunity to become involved in a wider range of tasks you are more likely to find this in a small company. For example, a small independent record label or music publisher. The more informal and flexible the music company you are working for, the wider the responsibilities you may be asked to take on. For example, in working for a small music producer or record label you may be involved with PR and marketing, copyright and royalties or artist liaison.

Regardless of the nature of the company you work with it can be an excellent way in to the music business and can offer a good opportunity for networking and building up contacts, as well as offering music industry experience. Some jobs will ask for experience with working in the arts and some knowledge of the music industry, possibly in a specialized area such as classical music.

A successful candidate is likely to be flexible and to have good organizational and IT skills, the ability to work on their own and within a team, and a knowledge of a number of office software packages. They will also need to have meticulous attention to detail and be able to work under pressure, as a lot of the work is responding to the demands of other people. Good customer care skills are also important.

Administrative Assistant jobs in the music industry may also involve providing administrative support for events such as concerts, gigs or tours, and sometimes helping to organize and promote them. The job may involve fielding calls from musicians, artists and clients and doing research. In some jobs, responsibilities will include reception which may involve answering calls, meeting and greeting visitors, and dealing with mail, faxes and deliveries. An Administrative Assistant job may also include acting as a PA, for example managing an appointment book, scheduling and organizing travel.

The work can be very diverse and there is often a chance to become involved in ad hoc projects, such as helping to organize a music event or helping to set up an online campaign to promote an artist or a record label.

An Administrator in the music industry can take on different roles depending on the size and nature of the organization they are working for. They may work for a record company, musician’s agency, orchestra, or music college, for example. Whatever the company, an Administrator is always in a position which is essential to the efficient working and success of the organization.

Administrator can be a very senior role and can involve managing staff and sometimes responsibilities for the probity of the company — ensuring it abides by legal and ethical regulations. It can also be a more junior role, for example, ensuring that the day to day business of the company is conducted effectively and all the necessary administrative tasks are done.

Working as an Administrator in the music industry can either be a satisfying job in its own right, or an excellent way to start a career in media or music. If you are looking for a varied role with the opportunity to become involved in a wider range of tasks you are more likely to find this in a small company, for example a small independent record label or music publisher. The more informal and flexible the music company you are working for the wider the responsibilities you may be asked to take on. For example, in working for a small music producer or record label you may be involved with PR and marketing, copyright and royalties or artist liaison.

Regardless of the nature of the company you work with it can be an excellent way into the music business and can offer a good opportunity for networking and building up contacts, as well as offering music industry experience. Some jobs will ask for experience with working in the arts and some knowledge of the music industry, possibly in a specialized area such as classical music.

A successful candidate is likely to be flexible and to have excellent organizational and IT skills, they may also need management skills if they are responsible for other staff. They will also need to have meticulous attention to detail and be able to work under pressure.

Administrator jobs in the music industry may also involve organizing and providing administrative support for events such as concerts, gigs or tours, and sometimes helping to organize and promote them. The job may involve setting up administrative systems to manage research, relationships with musicians, artists and clients, marketing and PR as well as providing other staff in the company with day to day administrative support.

The work can be very diverse and there is often a chance to become involved in ad hoc projects, such as helping to organize a music event or helping to set up an online campaign to promote an artist or a record label.

The Admissions Counselor is engaged by a college or university to assist the director of admissions across all functions of the school admissions process. S/he may seek out prospective students, presenting them with the benefits of education and student life at his or her institution, as well as provide current students with academic advice.

Counselors usually review not only the academic, but also the performing arts background of each applicant, in order to guide their academic career accordingly. Therefore Admission Counselors working for music colleges or music programs generally need to have music performance or education backgrounds. Many counselors are music professors themselves.

An Animateur produces images that appear to come to life on screen. Their animation can be seen in feature films, commercials, pop videos, computer games, websites and other media. They may work with drawings, specialist software or models and puppets, capturing separate images of each stage of a movement. When the images are viewed at speed the character appears to move.

An Arranger will rewrite a piece of existing music with additional new material or flesh out an existing idea or sketch for a singer, a group of performers or other music ensembles. A successful Arranger will work collaboratively with the writer with the aim of bringing out what the writer was trying to convey when they wrote it. They may make changes in the style, arrangement, or instrumentation and will add finishing touches and do the creative mixing.

One of the most important skills of a good Arranger is the ability to interpret these ideas and provide creative inspiration when desired. The writer, producer or music director will set guidelines on how a composition or song should be treated. A good Arranger is one who listens and works within these guidelines but is also able to make adjustments that will make the piece more effective.

An Arranger will usually work on a freelance basis, often from their own studio, to meet the needs of an artist, a group of musicians, a conductor, producer or music director. They will ensure that every aspect of a music piece is well harmonized, from the instruments down to the tempo. The music that an Arranger works on may either be an original piece or already existing music for which a new arrangement is required.

Some music Arrangers may work for an agency or company providing a range of services to musicians. An Arranger will be a musician and generally know how to play several instruments. They will have a good grasp of music theory, be able to read and write music, be able to transpose and transcribe and have a strong background in orchestration, harmony and composition.

Arrangers will depend on word of mouth for a lot of their work. Contacts in the music industry, developing networks and building up a portfolio and reputation will all be important in securing work. Some Arrangers develop their career to become composers or producers, others get job satisfaction and can have a lucrative career as an Arranger.

The Artist Liaison works as liaison between an artist and a hiring organization such as a record label or venue. This position ensures that both the artist and the hiring organization have a clear understanding of the logistics and business details of an event or tour, and encourage a musician’s association with the organization.

An Artist Liaison strengthens and develops the professional relationship between the artist and an organization by thinking strategically about how the relationship can benefit mutually from working with one another. They may be responsible for managing an artists’ attendance at events, ensuring that artists and agents are appropriately thanked and kept informed, as well as developing new key relationships with artists and agents.

They may also be tasked with developing and implementing across the organisation, creative and innovative strategies for utilizing an organization’s relationship with an artist.

An Artist Manager works on behalf of groups or artists to promote the artists’ careers and run their business affairs. Their job is to secure the best work for their clients, for the best fee.

The job may include: negotiating contracts and fees, finding and booking events and venues that match the artist’s career strategy, advising on career decisions, publicity and promotion, helping them on career decisions such as which record producer to work with, or which songs to perform, and managing media relations on their behalf.

The Artist Manager’s work is very competitive and can be intense and sometimes stressful with long hours. Artist Managers are frequently required to attend their artists’ performances in the evening or over weekends.

Most Artist Managers advance by building a strong reputation for good client services, and attracting more top performers onto their books.

Artist Managers’ salaries are often dependent on the work they secure for their clients, for example they may keep between 10 percent to 25 percent of the overall fee.

Some managers start their career by managing the careers of friends. Others start off as entertainers themselves, and gain knowledge by promoting their own talents, and some start by gaining a junior job in a record company and work their way up to the role of Manager.

Artist Managers may represent a roster of artists, and cultivate relationships with music industry decision makers on their behalf. They will negotiate deals, and support and guide their clients’ careers.

Artist Managers must keep up to date with what’s happening in the industry, and they will spend a lot of time establishing and maintaining relationships, using contacts to source work for their clients. They will also promote their clients’ work, and will often be involved in liaison during the music recording process. They may also organize and negotiate contracts for release and publishing, and they communicate with the press.

Industry experience and knowledge is the key to becoming an Artist Manager. No specific qualifications are required, but a business background is useful, especially in sales. The main qualification is a sound knowledge of the music business and current trends and the ability to develop and maintain a range of industry contacts, requiring good judgment, which is acquired through experience by working in the role.

An Assistant Artist Manager (also known as Assistant Talent Manager), is an individual or company who guides the professional career of artists in the entertainment industry. The responsibility of the talent manager is to oversee the day-to-day business affairs of an artist; advise and counsel talent concerning professional matters, long-term plans and personal decisions which may affect their career.

In Film, the role of an Assistant director includes tracking daily progress against the filming production schedule, arranging logistics, preparing daily call sheets, checking cast and crew, and maintaining order on the set. They also have to take care of health and safety of the crew. In Theatre, a person in this position is responsible for being at every rehearsal and meeting and for filling in for the director when his schedule requires him to be in two places at once, such as at a rehearsal with the cast and at a production meeting with the technical crew.

This position is an entry-level editing job, assisting editors in various tasks. It has the responsibility of reviewing copy, and may read and evaluate manuscripts. Other working titles may be production assistant or copy editor. Responsiblities may include conducting research, fact checking, or copy editing, offering comments to improve the work of writers, providing administrative support to the editor, conducting data inputting and database searching, maintaining production schedules, and reporting on production progress.

In Film and Television, an Assistant Music Editor helps the Music Editor match music to visual scenes in a manner that enhances the feel and impact of a film. They make sure the music is in tempo with the scenes and that the music is an enhancement and not a distraction.

An Assistant Tour Manager helps to organize the administration for a schedule of appearances of a musical group (band) or artist at a sequence of venues (a concert tour). In general, road managers handle small to medium-sized tours, and tour managers are used on large-scale tours.

The Associate Producer is an individual who performs a limited number of producing functions delegated to her/him by a producer, under the direct supervision and control of that producer. The term may also refer to a person who would qualify as an executive producer of a project, but for the fact that (s)he acts on behalf of a production company which is subordinate to another one on that project.

From TV and movies, to CD and radio, an Audio Engineer makes the transmission and translation of sound, atmosphere, and music possible. They’re a vital part of any production and tend to work in groups, especially on larger productions such as movies. An audio engineer uses machinery and equipment to record, synchronize, mix or reproduce music, voices, or sound effects. He or she can work in the movie, music recording, theater or video game industries. Audio engineers may also be called sound engineering technicians, recording engineers or sound engineers.

Audio Programmers work in the digital games industry. They are responsible for the processing, storage and playback of sound effects and music in the game. They write the software tools and utilities to support the sound and music. It is a highly skilled job and Audio Programmers need a high level of technical knowledge and understanding of a wide range of computer programs as well as a passion for the games. They will often work both for the game team directly and the software department. The Audio Programmer is responsible for ensuring the game sounds as good as it looks and plays. Their work will be essential to the atmosphere of the game and to making sure that sound and music are properly integrated and enhance the experience for players. The Audio Programmer will work closely with the audio production department, and they may be responsible for development of the audio component of the company’s software as well as the playback and mixing routines in the game itself.

The specific role and the skills required to fill it will vary according to the particular game. An Audio Programmer may need an understanding of the MIDI standard, of audio production and of mixing and recording processes, real time sound synthesis, audio compression standards and signal processing, and interactive music APIs.

It is a fast and constantly changing field of work, and an Audio Programmer will need to keep up to date with any developments in hardware and software. The advent of more powerful game hardware has opened up many new avenues for audio programing, with surround sound and physically modeled audio joining the established requirement for software DSP algorithms.

As well as excellent knowledge of specific software packages an Audio Programmer will need an understanding of underlying principles, which means a good grounding in physics and maths. For example they will need an understanding of music and wave theory, Fourier transform theory and practice, frequency analysis and the physics of audio transmission. They will also need and be able to work with a range of software programs and packages, including Windows programing, Max/MSP, Java, or C/C++, 3D environmental audio packages and audio API.

Quality Audio Programmers are much sought after in the games industry, so there is a good chance of securing work for those with the right skills and qualifications. A computer science related university degree is often required as well as an understanding of audio production. Someone interested in becoming an Audio Programmer will also often be expected to demonstrate an element of prior experience in this area and have an enthusiasm for games.

A Backing Vocalist or Backing Singer is a singer who doesn’t sing in the lead but sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other Backing Vocalists, or alone for effect on the instrumentals rather than singing the lead. Some Backing Vocalists are also work as session singers. Most Backing Vocalists work on a contract basis, but some may be contracted full time to an agency or production team.

Some Backing Singers may specialize in harmony. They are skilled in hearing harmony lines over and around the music and can vocally reproduce what they hear to create a harmony vocal line without requiring written sheet music, or direction from the songwriter or producer. Some singers have natural talent in this, but it is possible to train people in these skills.

Backing Singers are often supplied with sheet music which they sight read and sing the notes as directed. A versatile and competent singer can find work in recording studios to support a recording session, singing advertising jingles, and singing with backing bands and artists. Studio time costs money and an artist who can go in and do the job quickly and competently is highly regarded.

Singing by ear and reading sheet music are both important skills for Backing Vocalists, as is good vocal control. Any type of voice may be required from a Backing Singer. The important thing is that it is the right voice for the particular project, and that the voice is compatible with the other vocalists.

Many solo vocalists and lead singers start their careers as a Backing Singer with a band. It offers good experience and helps build contacts in the music industry. It also offers the chance of being noticed by other musicians and A&R. Backing Vocalists can broaden their experience and even supplement their income by joining choirs, teaching adults or children and participating in community music events.

Experience, talent and commitment are the main ingredients of success. There are a number of professional qualifications and a variety of training courses available at schools, universities and specialized music schools. Many singers also offer private tuition.

Creating a demo to send out can be helpful. It should include a few of your best songs to show your vocal range. Include one simple vocal track with you singing the melody line as well as examples of your backing and harmony singing abilities. Using the internet to browse classifieds is helpful, and creating your own website or profile on the internet can also create opportunities and help showcase your talent.

A Bar Manager keeps a bar operating effectively. If the bar is located at a hotel or restaurant, the manager may also oversee dining and food preparation. The bar manager reviews the inventory, manages the money and staff, buys supplies and ensures that the bar meets legislative directives. She must also establish a physical presence at the bar and make adjustments to ensure customer service is consistently high.

Bar managers regularly review bar operations, including special-event setups, prices and hours. He also prepares staff schedules, communicates with employees, ensures the bar is adequately staffed at all times, keeps record of supplies and cash, and replenishes the bar and cash drawer.

A barback keeps a bar stocked with all the dishes and supplies bartender needs. This includes clean glasses for wine or beer and utensils if the bar sells food. A barback will restock beer, change the tap on a keg and restock any liquor the bartender needs. A barback usually makes a salary and receives 10 percent of the bartenders’ tips. Many barbacks eventually train into a bartender.

A bouncer or security guard often cards a person to identify if he is old enough to enter the bar. A bouncer will also monitor for any illegal activity, intervene if a fight occurs, and provide security so the bar runs smoothly.

Other jobs a bar may have is a hostess or host, on-staff DJ, and the bar manager or owner. A host greets patrons on arrival, collects a cover charge for entrance, and may seat patrons. Some bars will employ a full-time DJ that provides music or karaoke.

A Board Operator or Board Op is a particular type of operator at a radio station, television studio, or at a live production such as a theater or concert venue that provides live event support. The board operator is responsible for operation of the control system (board), and in the case of temporary or portable productions, the board op will also be responsible for the installation and testing of the control system as well.

A Booker schedules live performances for their clients. To do so, they must network with venue operators, music promoters and other Bookers. They handle all financial matters in connection with the date and coordinate the scheduling logistics. Music Bookers may also be involved with promoting the events they book.

Music Bookers must be organized, motivated and have good communication skills. Computer skills are needed to maintain databases of contacts and venue information. Knowledge of tour schedules is essential and having a talent for recognizing the potential in up-and-coming musicians helps Bookers succeed.

An Artist Booker, or Booking Agent, works in the music industry to book performers for concerts, gigs and other live music performances. They often schedule performances and negotiate with the artists directly or with booking representatives or producers to arrange terms of contract, dates, and fees. They may also audition new talent. Artist Bookers or Booking Agents may either be employed in-house or work independently. They may specialize in independent bookings in a particular musical genre such as cabaret, chamber music or rock or pop music. An Artist Booker or Booking Agent may even sponsor, manage and produce the whole event.

A Booking Agent is responsible for booking live performances including concerts, gigs, tours and radio and TV performances for artists, bands, DJs, choirs, orchestras and other musical ensembles. They are responsible for developing the musicians’ or artists’ career with regard to their live performance. A Booking Agent, or Artist Booker, will work closely with the artists’ management, promoter and record company. Sometimes, especially with new and emerging artists the manager will combine their role with that of Booking Agent. They will usually work on a whole tour rather than just one gig. They will often require an exclusive contract on touring activity, especially if the artist is signed.

The Agent will be responsible for negotiating and issuing contracts, collecting deposits and sending out promotional material. They may work freelance, be part of the band, or work for a music company or agency. They may be responsible for one artist, band or musical ensemble, or for several. They will often work on a commission basis and usually get around 10 – 15% commission of the artist’s fee.

Some Booking Agents will provide all styles of artists and musicians ranging from classical to dance music and cover a range of events including bars, clubs, local, corporate and trade events. Others provide entertainment for cruise ships, theaters, hotels and international venues. Some Booking Agents will specialize in musicians and producers working in particular genres, such as rock, pop, dance, urban or acoustic.

Many Booking Agents will offer a portfolio of services for their clients, including artist management services, or marketing, distribution and publicity campaigns for a variety of media.

Excellent knowledge of the music industry and keeping in touch with current music trends is essential, as is building up an excellent network of contacts in the music business. There are no specific professional qualifications required. Building up experience in the music industry is important. This can be done by working in different capacities — any work that brings you music business contacts and keeps you in touch with the industry will help. Many Booking Agents are musicians who have built up their expertise on the job working for themselves, their own ensembles, bands or for friends who are musicians.

A Booking Manager negotiates contracts with performers and/or agents in booking the
concerts. The booking manager is also responsible for reserving concert venues.

Working in the music industry as a Box Office Assistant can be a good way of experiencing the excitement of live performances and playing an important role in keeping customers happy and things running smoothly. A Box Office Assistant needs to maintain high standards of customer service and remain positive, confident and outgoing whatever the demands. They are the first point of contact for visitors to venues, and will be selling tickets for a wide range of events both over the phone and in person. The hours can be long, particularly during music festivals and special events, and the role usually involves regular evening and weekend work.

Box Office Assistants usually report to the box office manager, or sometimes to a team leader or supervisor. They will need to be able to demonstrate first rate keyboard, cash handling and numerical skills and will be expected to be flexible in terms of their hours and in juggling the tasks that they are required to take on. They will be expected to know, or to be trained in, the particular box office system the venue operates, such as The Patron Edge ticketing system.

Responsibilities of a Box Office Assistant include: providing a quality front line service to customers, selling tickets using both manual and computerized systems, dealing counter, telephone and internet bookings, maintaining information and display material in the front of house and in the box office area.

Possibilities for career development for a Box Office Assistant include progression to supervisor or box office manager, where responsibilities are broader and can include sales, marketing, events management and venue management responsibilities. There are then possibilities to work in venue or events management in the music business or to develop skills in marketing and sales.

A Box Office Manager is responsible for managing the box office and supervising the box office assistants and other staff. They have overall responsibility for making sure customers are well looked after and happy with the service. The job of Box Officer Manager is often part of the marketing department of the venue and the Box Office Manager may be responsible for maximizing revenue from the sale of tickets. They may be expected to provide comprehensive database analysis and other information to support the marketing objectives of the venue, such as sales information, audience profiling and identifying audience trends.

Working in the music industry as a Box Office Manager can be a good way of experiencing the excitement of live performances, playing an important role in keeping customers happy and things running smoothly as well as contributing to the business success of the venue. The hours can be long, particularly during music festivals and special events, and the role usually involves regular evening and weekend work.

The responsibilities of the Box Office Manager will include managing box office staff and ensuring that they are appropriately trained, managing box office systems, sales, banking, rotas, reporting and evaluation of sales and system management. A Box Office Manager will be expected to have excellent proven customer care skills and experience with computerized box office systems. They may also be expected to have sales and marketing skills and experience. Often they will be responsible for the look of the foyer and front of house, making sure marketing and promotional materials are displayed effectively and health and safety rules are adhered to.

As well as being responsible for ticket sales a Box Office Manager may be responsible for the sales of other items and services, such as memberships, programs, merchandise, or refreshments, including pre-performance meals. The box office is also often the general reception and box office staff may need to deal with inquiries from other members of staff, assist with the organization of interviews and the delivery and dispatch of goods.

Possibilities for career development for a Box Office Manager include progression to venue management, a role in marketing or sales, or a business development role in the music or events industry.

The role of a Brand Manager or Product Manager working in the music industry is to help create and implement marketing campaigns to maximize the sales of music from a particular record label, artist, online music service, radio station or other music product. They will usually be employed by a large or well established record label or music company and are likely to be responsible for managing the campaigns for a specific artist, product or group of artists. For example a large record company may have a range of different musical genres and they may appoint a Brand Manager to manage the campaign for their classical portfolio or for their jazz portfolio. They may also be employed by a marketing agency that specializes in marketing services to the music or creative industries. All sorts of events, products and artists may be defined as a brand. For example Top of the Pops is considered a major global music brand and has a Brand Manager who works across all media and markets, nationally and internationally.

Knowledge of the music business and of current trends, along with good knowledge of competitors and good networking skills, is essential. Defining the unique identity and market positioning of an artist or product is a key task. Good skills in teamwork are important as the Brand or Product Manager will need to work closely with other departments, including public relations and sales. The tasks carried out by a Product Manager are varied and can change from campaign to campaign. They may have some input in to initial decisions the company makes on what to prioritize and where to focus their efforts. They may be involved in working with focus groups, managing and responding to feedback and handling, packaging, advertising, and sales promotions. A Brand or Product Manager may be involved in planning and organizing publicity and promotion work around events, live performances and tours, and their tasks can range from design, creation and distribution of packaging and marketing materials such as cover images, posters, websites and point of sale assets, to liaising with media buyers about placing advertisements.

The work can involve long hours while managing deadlines and launch and release dates can be stressful. Excellent project management skills are very important. Experience with product management in other industries, particularly other creative and entertainment industries can be a bonus. Experience in dealing with intellectual property licensors and promotional partners, as well as sales distributors, and localization and translation providers is helpful. The Product or Brand Manager will also need experience in managing marketing budgets, analyzing customer and audience behavior and sales trends.

The role of a Brand Manager or Product Manager working in the music industry is to help create and implement marketing campaigns to maximize the sales of music from a particular record label, artist, online music service, radio station or other music product. They will usually be employed by a large or well established record label or music company and are likely to be responsible for managing the campaigns for a specific artist, product or group of artists. For example a large record company may have a range of different musical genres and they may appoint a Brand Manager to manage the campaign for their classical portfolio or for their jazz portfolio. They may also be employed by a marketing agency that specializes in marketing services to the music or creative industries. All sorts of events, products and artists may be defined as a brand. For example Top of the Pops is considered a major global music brand and has a Brand Manager who works across all media and markets, nationally and internationally.

Knowledge of the music business and of current trends, along with good knowledge of competitors and good networking skills, is essential. Defining the unique identity and market positioning of an artist or product is a key task. Good skills in teamwork are important as the Brand or Product Manager will need to work closely with other departments, including public relations and sales. The tasks carried out by a Product Manager are varied and can change from campaign to campaign. They may have some input in to initial decisions the company makes on what to prioritize and where to focus their efforts. They may be involved in working with focus groups, managing and responding to feedback and handling, packaging, advertising, and sales promotions. A Brand or Product Manager may be involved in planning and organizing publicity and promotion work around events, live performances and tours, and their tasks can range from design, creation and distribution of packaging and marketing materials such as cover images, posters, websites and point of sale assets, to liaising with media buyers about placing advertisements.

The work can involve long hours while managing deadlines and launch and release dates can be stressful. Excellent project management skills are very important. Experience with product management in other industries, particularly other creative and entertainment industries can be a bonus. Experience in dealing with intellectual property licensors and promotional partners, as well as sales distributors, and localization and translation providers is helpful. The Product or Brand Manager will also need experience in managing marketing budgets, analyzing customer and audience behavior and sales trends.

A Business Affairs Assistant has a wide range of duties and responsibilities in an organization. S/he may be allocated to assist in the various affairs of a single department or project or might be required to assist in the responsibilities of the entire organization. His or her basic duties involve assistance with daily office administration, business operations, and budgetary recommendations. He also assists in the process of submitting detailed reports about the working of the organization. More importantly, a business affairs assistant helps form a liaison between an organization and the public.

A Business Affairs Manager has a wide range of duties and responsibilities in an organization.

S/he may be allocated to oversee the various affairs of a single department or project or might be required to oversee the responsibilities of an entire organization. His or her basic duties involve supervision of performances of staff, business operations, and budgetary recommendations. He or she also plays an active role in decision making process by submitting detailed reports about the working of the organization.

More importantly, a Business Affairs Manager forms a liaison between the organization and the public.

A Business Consultant is a position that requires someone with insight, foresight, and a general overall perspective of a company and where it stands among its competitors. This is often a role that is outsourced or a contracted position by a company, because it requires someone who is not necessarily a part of the integral day to day operations of that company.

The role of a Business Development Assistant in the music industry is to provide support in the growth and development of the company, orchestra or other music ensemble, record company or community music organization. Their job may be to support growing sales, raise funding and sponsorship or reaching more or different types of audiences and clients. The role is very varied and depends on the nature of the business and what their specific needs are. Business Development Assistants may help with gathering information and research about the current position of the company. For example, what is the demographic profile of the current audience for an orchestra and are they missing out on reaching particular groups, such as young people. They may help with conducting surveys and collecting feedback, entering the data into the databases and statistical analysis software and producing reports. They may also be involved in producing, or helping to produce and distribute promotional and marketing materials, or in organizing events and marketing and PR campaigns.

A Business Development Assistant specializing in the music business will need a good understanding of music and the music industry, and of current and emerging trends. They will need good numerical and data entry skills and will sometimes also be expected to have statistical and general analysis skills, although as an Assistant training will often be provided. Sometimes a Business Development Assistant is employed to fulfill a specific role, such as encouraging a bigger audience or more sales from a specific harder to reach sector of the community, or to maximize the audience or sales via the internet. In these cases they may be required to have some experience in these areas, although good all around skills are acceptable. Good administrative and organizational skills are important in this role. There are no specific professional requirements, but there are a number of courses available at all levels in research and analysis, and in marketing.

The job title Business Development Assistant is sometimes used synonymously with Marketing Assistant, and many of the tasks of the job are the same. Many companies and organizations will not distinguish between the two, but Business Development Assistant can sometimes be a broader and more varied role. A successful Business Development Assistant can progress to more senior business development and marketing roles, and may move more into general senior management or chief executive roles, or set up their own business.

A Business Development Manager in the music industry will be employed by a music company, artist, music ensemble or music organization to be responsible for carrying out strategy to develop their business, their profile or their organization in line with what they want to achieve. The role is very varied and depends on the nature of the business and what their specific needs are. A Business Development Manager will manage the team of people responsible for researching the existing market and emerging trends in the music industry, or in the particular area the company specializes in, such as classical music. They will use statistical data and analysis to make recommendations on where there is potential for growth or change and to advise on the strategy for growth. They may also analyze the position of the company or organization and make recommendations on any changes they may need to make in the structure or activities of the company in order to achieve their objectives.

A Business Development Manager specializing in the music business will need a thorough understanding of the music industry, and in particular of any niche or specialized sectors of the industry, and of current and emerging trends. They will be expected to analyze the existing customer base or audience and current revenues from, for example, ticket sales, downloads or other music sales. They will then need to identify potential opportunities and advise on any action that may be required to maximize further potential.

As well as music industry knowledge a Business Development Manager will need excellent numerical and statistical analysis skills, database skills, a detailed and organized approach to work while retaining an ability to see “the big picture” and an aptitude for planning and project management. As Managers they will also need excellent staff management skills. There are a number of professional qualifications available, including the postgraduate Masters in Business Administration (MBA).

An example of business analysis and its consequences is the deal Nokia made with Sony BMG in April 2008 to offer free 12 month access to the label’s tracks in its “Comes with Music” service, adding to their previous deal with Universal. They now aim to get smaller music companies on board, challenging the dominant pay-per-track sales model for digital music. The new music offering from Nokia is different from other packages on the market as users can keep all the music they have downloaded during the 12 months. These new possibilities reflect the trend that a growing number of people are leaving their digital music players at home and using phones as their music devices.

Person who makes and repairs wooden objects and structures.

The Catalog Assistant is responsible for assisting in the compiling, sorting, shelving, issuing and receiving of catalog materials such as electronic media. This position must locate catalog materials and replace material in shelving areas, stacks, databases or files according to identification number and title.

The Catalog Manager is responsible for compiling, sorting, shelving, issuing and receiving of catalog materials such as electronic media. This position must locate catalog materials and replace material in shelving areas, stacks, databases or files according to identification number and title.

A Catalog Assistant will be employed by a music publisher, record label, music archive or any company that has a music resource that needs to be made available and easily accessible to users and clients. They may help to set up the management systems for the catalog, maintain the records and keep them up to date, and help in promoting and publicizing the catalog. The catalog may be for the general public, specific sectors of the general public such as music academics and researchers, or for the internal use of the company. Catalogs in the music industry may comprise of live music, sheet music, historical archives, music related books, musical instruments or anything related to the music business.

Most catalogs are available online, but they may also be printed. A Catalog Assistant may be required to have knowledge of the music industry, or of the specific area the company operates in. For example a record label holding a specialized jazz catalog may require, or prefer, a Catalog Assistant with a knowledge of, and enthusiasm for jazz. As well as managing the administration of the catalog a Catalog Assistant sometimes also has a sales or marketing role.

A Catalog Assistant needs to be very organized and have an eye for detail. They will need to be confident in their use of IT and may be expected to have experience in working with particular types of catalog management software. They will need good administrative and data entry skills. If they are working with printed catalogs, an understanding of design and print processes will be important. At the assistant level training is usually provided in the more specialized aspects of the job, and an employer will mainly be looking for someone with sound, basic skills and commitment.

Many Catalog Assistants will work online using special catalog manager software which allows users to edit existing albums, tracks and singles or add new ones to the system. They also include up to the minute sales reporting and stock management. Online systems will be used for managing sales and stock control of most music products.

A Catalog Manager will be employed by a music publisher, record label, music archive or any company that has a music resource that needs to be made available and easily accessible to users and clients. They may devise, implement and maintain the management systems for the catalog, and help to promote and publicize the catalog. The catalog may be for the general public or specific sectors of the general public such as music academics and researchers, or for the internal use of the company. Catalogs in the music industry may comprise of live music, sheet music, historical archives, music related books, musical instruments or anything related to the music business.

Most catalogs are available online, but they may also be printed. A Catalog Manager will be required to have knowledge of the music industry, or of the specific area the company operates in. For example a record label holding a specialized jazz catalog is likely to require a catalog assistant with a knowledge of, and enthusiasm for jazz. As well as managing the administration of the catalog a Catalog Manager often also has a sales or marketing role. They are likely to have an important role in deciding what goes into the catalog, and what comes out. This will include managing information about copyright, royalties and licensing. Many Catalog Managers, especially those working for record labels, will be responsible for licensing and will be expected to have expertise in this area. They will also monitor sales data, provide reports and analysis and make recommendations as well as having an input in to how and where the catalog is promoted.

A Catalog Manager needs to be very organized, have an eye for detail and be an excellent project manager. They will need to be confident in their use of IT and will be expected to have experience in analyzing data and working with particular types of catalog management software. If they are working with printed catalogs an understanding of design and print processes will be important. Sales and marketing expertise, and a knowledge of the market will also be highly valued.

A Catalog Manager will be responsible for developing the catalog strategy as well as delivering it on time and within budget. In addition to management skills good team working skills are important, as the job requires liaison with PR and marketing departments or staff, and often with musicians and with outside agencies.

Choreographers create and arrange original dances, combining steps and movements to form an artistic whole. They also develop new interpretations of traditional dances. Choreographers usually audition performers and teach them a dance at rehearsals. They often stage and direct presentations of their own works.

The Club DJ works primarily at nightclubs and bars. Most Club DJs have residencies (secured gigs at specific clubs) and perform daily, weekly or monthly. The most important goal of the club DJ is to keep the dance floor packed with patrons, while clearing it periodically so that bar sales will increase.

A Club Manager or Nightclub Manager is responsible for the cost effective and successful operation of the club. The character of clubs in the music industry is very diverse. Some will offer live music most or all nights, some may specialize in DJs. Whether the club is independent or owned by a chain it has its own identity and is likely to specialize in a particular type of music, such as dance, house, folk or rock.

A Club Manager’s role involves a wide variety of tasks and a high level of responsibility. Managers are responsible for ensuring that the club is operated as an efficient and profitable business, and that all licensing and heath and safety legislation are adhered to.

A Club Manager may be involved in organizing and promoting new music and entertainment events, booking musicians and DJs, developing the club’s marketing strategy, managing the club’s membership, including attracting new audiences and clients and retaining existing ones. They may be required to have an input into the club’s music policy.

A key part of the Club Manager’s role is to oversee the day to day operation of the club, ensuring that the various functions work together smoothly. This will involve: managing club staff, including recruitment and training, ensuring high standards are maintained throughout the club’s premises, ensuring health and safety standards are maintained, organizing and publicizing music events, negotiating with artists, DJs and bands, dealing with paperwork, managing stock and premise maintenance and overseeing the management of club premises and facilities.

Contacts and networks in the music business can be an asset. Many clubs will look for a Club Manager with marketing experience and contacts in the area of music they specialize in, such as DJ music. A Club Manager that is familiar with the area and with the competitors is always highly valued. Competitor visits to check out other venues’ music, admissions policies and promotions can be an important part of the job. Personal contact such as meeting customers and managing VIP parties and guest lists also helps to make a successful Club Manager.

A career in Club Management requires a great deal of energy and commitment. Hours can be long and late nights and weekend work are routine. A Club Manager will have excellent project management and administrative skills, good numeracy and literacy, excellent people and people management skills, an enthusiasm for music and the club scene and a talent for marketing and promotion.

Community Music Workers collaborate with a wide variety of local groups, encouraging the use of music related activities to support their development and improve the quality of life of individuals from the local community. A Community Music Worker will often work in areas where there are social, cultural or environmental issues to be addressed. Many of the people they work with come from groups that are considered to be disadvantaged or vulnerable in some way, such as children from disadvantaged backgrounds, young offenders, people with mental health issues, the elderly, people with disabilities and ethnic minorities. Community Music Workers may be exposed to difficult or stressful situations, depending on the nature of the project, but research shows a high level of job satisfaction in this field.

Many Community Music Workers are employed on a freelance or short term contract for the duration of the project. The work varies considerably depending on the nature of the project and the nature of the communities it aims to involve. In some cases, the work is mainly musical and creative in nature, particularly if the role is as an ‘artist in residence’ for a specific project or initiative. However, many Community Music Workers have a more administrative, strategic and managerial role. Their role may be more of a project management and outreach role with the job of designing and managing the project, securing the participation of local communities and ensuring the involvement of those groups the project aims to reach. Some Community Music Workers employed in an outreach or project management role will be employed in local government, or by art companies, agencies or charities as project officers or coordinators.

Long working hours and weekend and evening work are common, as working hours are linked to project work and the needs of the community. Work takes place in a variety of settings, typically places such as libraries, youth centers, care homes, schools and prisons. There is also often opportunity for outdoor work as projects may involve work at festivals.

Creative work could involve projects such as working with a particular group within the community to compose and create a piece of music for performance. Practical music projects could involve setting up vocal groups or choirs in care homes, or encouraging young offenders to participate in music making or music technology workshops. Other project management roles for Community Music Workers may include working with specific communities to identify areas of need or concern, fundraising, offering advice and support to community groups on involving people in music participation and enjoyment, developing new ideas for projects, coordinating or managing music events and festivals, marketing and PR and collaborating with social and youth workers, art agencies and other groups in the community.

Music Composers create works of music that can be performed by orchestras, voices, groups of musicians and soloists. The compositions may be in any style, such as classical, rock, soul, rhythm and blues, opera, pop, jazz, funk, blues, big band, country or folk. As well as music for live performance, Composers create music for film, radio, computer, hand held games and other media.

Composers create their compositions with rhythm, melody and texture in a variety of ways. Some Composers do not begin working on a composition until they have planned the outline, either on paper or in their head. Others like to make a series of short sketches before they put the whole work together.

Some Composers use electronic tools, such as computers and synthesizers in their writing. Whatever the instrumentation, they need to be aware of the possibilities and limitations of each instrument and the human voice.

Composers of any genre of music have usually had instrumental training and many are performers. They use this experience as their introduction to composing. Being a Composer or songwriter is rarely a full time occupation. Most Composers are self employed and are paid a fee for the commissions they take on. Many musicians adopt the role at some stage in their careers, often while working in other jobs.

Composers for film productions need to be able to compose in different styles. They must be able to improvise, and to create themes quickly to deadlines. The ability to listen to directors, and to translate their vision into musical terms, is crucial. Many Composers use samples, and produce electronic scores. Computer skills, and the ability to work with new technology are increasingly required. Composers must have a feel for drama and narrative, and the ability to write music to pictures. An understanding of the technical side of filmmaking, and an appreciation of how this affects the sound, are also important. Imagination and a passion for film and music are essential.

Composers usually have some form of musical training, but talent and the drive to write music for films are more important than qualifications. There are some specific courses in composing available, however, industry experience and knowledge are equally valued.

A Concert Assistant will usually be employed by an orchestra or other musical ensemble in the field of classical music. Their job is to ensure the smooth running of the rehearsal and concert, with particular responsibilities for the orchestra, soloists and conductor or other musicians. The Concert Assistant will make sure the requirements of the detailed rehearsal and concert schedule are met. These requirements are often set out by the conductor or concert manager.

A Concert Assistant may help with the administrative and clerical tasks in the run-up to the concert and on the day, scheduling auditions, typing letters of acceptance, arranging performance dates, brochure and biography typing, ushering, providing simple refreshments, and keeping statistics about ticket sales and costs.

They may also be required to keep abreast of progress during rehearsal, and help to manage the logistics and rearrange timetables if musicians are running late or are unavailable. They will usually report to the conductor or concert manager.

Where necessary they may implement stage setup changes in line with the agreed stage plan, and possibly keep records of the different stage settings for different pieces as required. They may be responsible, with the concert manager for keeping a watching brief on the arrival and whereabouts of orchestral or ensemble performers, and for notifying the conductor of any problems with the schedule. A Concert Assistant will help implement stage setup changes between pieces, notifying the conductor and soloists when stage changes between pieces are complete and send them onto the concert platform.

A Concert Assistant will need good administrative and project management skills, and must be confident working under pressure. It can be a good route to a career in music or events management. It is not always necessary to have a music background but it is helpful if they have an appreciation of the type of music they are assisting with and some understanding of the needs of the musicians. Marketing and PR skills are also appreciated.

A Concert Manager will usually be employed by an orchestra or other musical ensemble in the field of classical music, or by a concert venue. Their job is to ensure the smooth running of the rehearsal and concert, with particular responsibilities for the orchestra, soloists and conductor or other musicians. They will make decisions, with the conductor or director, about rehearsals, concert schedules and arrangements, and make sure those requirements are met.

The Concert Manager’s task will include making the necessary arrangements for each dress rehearsal and concert, on site implementation of the arrangements, liaison with the conductor and other key people to decide what equipment and arrangements will be needed (for example lighting or risers), see that these arrangements are made, procure and arrange for the transportation of borrowed equipment to the hall and for its return, organize access arrangements needed to get into the venue to set up, take down, and store equipment. They may also be responsible for the concert seating plan if desired by the music director or conductor.

Depending on the organization they work for, a Concert Manager role may overlap with that of promoter. They may have responsibilities for programing, negotiating deals, budgeting, ticketing, licenses, taxes, work permits, deal memos, contracts, sponsorship, public funding, production, staging and promotion.

A Concert Manager will need excellent organizational and project management skills, and be confident working under pressure. They will also need good staff management skills as they will usually be responsible for other staff working on the concert. It can be a senior role in itself, depending on the organization they work for, or a good route to a senior position in music or events management. They will need to have an appreciation of the type of music played at the concerts they manage, and of the needs of the musicians. Marketing and PR skills are also appreciated and are sometimes a key part of the job.

Music Conductors help groups of instrumentalists and singers to interpret and perform pieces of music. They prepare musical scores for performance, and form clear ideas about how they should sound. They then lead a group of performers and help them to realize these ideas, making sure that performers understand their roles and play and sing well together, producing the right notes at the right speed.

Conductors work with a range of performers including amateur and professional orchestras and choruses, church choirs, music students, and youth and community music groups. Some work on stage musicals or recorded soundtracks for film and TV.

Conductors must be flexible about working hours as daytime, evening and weekend work are all usually required. They work in theaters, concert halls, churches, recording studios, rehearsal rooms and music libraries. Outdoor concert venues like sports’ stadiums and stately homes are becoming increasingly popular.

Most Conductors spend their entire professional careers studying and improving their skills. This is not usually part of a formal training program, but is done because they love music. They may also attend workshops and master classes. Some specialized music colleges offer training schemes for outstanding students who are mentored by professional musicians. Some postgraduates are employed as repetiteurs in opera companies. As well as accompanying rehearsals on the piano and coaching the singers, they can observe and learn from established Conductors.

It is important for Conductors wishing to progress to take on as much amateur and professional conducting work as possible and build a good list of contacts. Many combine conducting with other relevant work, including playing professionally, composing, teaching, community and education work and recording.

A Consultant is someone who advises on and suggests new ideas to improve or maintain growth in a company’s business structure.

The Controller position is responsible for the overall accounting department of a company. This includes generating and distributing financial reports, maintaining financial records, defining company budgets, and ensuring fair and legal practices of all company financial reporting.

In the Music Industry, a Copyist creates the final, written music to use during a recording session. Traditionally, the composer or orchestrator would present the Copyist with a music score written in pencil. From this written score the Copyist would create a clean, computer-engraved copy using software such as Finale or Sibelius.

The Copyist is responsible for creating a computer generated copy of the score as well as the individual parts for each instrument, making sure everything is bound and well organized to avoid wasted time during the expensive recording session.

With the advent of computer sequencing software and composers that do not write music, copyists now also must be able to create score directly from MIDI sequences without having a written score for reference.

A Copyright Assistant generally assists in collecting and distributing royalties due to copyright owners. Responsibilities can include registering claims to songs at collection agencies, processing the royalties which result from the exploitation of songs, data entry of song information into copyright/royalty systems and copyright research.

Charitable giving to human causes on a large scale. Philanthropy must be more than just a charitable donation; it is an effort undertaken by an individual or organization based on an altruistic desire to improve human welfare. Wealthy individuals sometimes establish foundations to facilitate their philanthropic efforts.

A Creative Services Assistant will provide support to the Creative Services Manager. This position deals with the marketing, advertising, promotions, and other media related arms of a company.

A Creative Services Manager will be the lead on projects requiring creative services. This position deals with the marketing, advertising, promotions, and other media related arms of a company. This position may require design for visuals representing the company, new ideas for promotions, new media, or other inventive ways to better the company.

A Crew is responsible for handling stage properties such as scenery and equipment in a theatrical production.

A Customer Support Representative is the person who will provide quality assurance and information to customers. They are the liaison between the company and it’s customers, and serve customers by providing product and service information and resolving product and service problems.

Customer support representatives are generally responsible for attracting potential customers by answering product and service questions; suggesting information about other products and services, opening customer accounts by recording account information, maintaining customer records by updating account information, resolves product or service problems by clarifying the customer’s complaint; determining the cause of the problem; selecting and explaining the best solution to solve the problem; expediting correction or adjustment; following up to ensure resolution, maintaining financial accounts by processing customer adjustments, recommending potential products or services to management by collecting customer information and analyzing customer needs, preparing product or service reports by collecting and analyzing customer information, and contributing to team effort by accomplishing related results as needed.

A Dance Instructor instructs, explains, and demonstrates techniques and methods of dance with musical or rhythmic accompaniment to students of all ages. This position is hands-on, requiring the instructor to be able to demonstrate methods and techniques for the class, observe and correct students as they attempt maneuvers themselves, and offer suggestions to students on how to improve their dance techniques.

A Dancer uses movement, gesture and body language to portray a character, story, situation or abstract concept to an audience, usually to the accompaniment of music. This usually involves interpreting the work of a choreographer, however it may sometimes require improvisation. Many dancers follow portfolio careers, combining performance with teaching, choreography or administrative work in a dance company.

Every computer program needs the support of the database as a backend for its proper functioning, and Database Developers design these database systems from scratch. Responsibilities may include collecting data, analyzing the collected information, designing algorithms, drawing flowcharts and then implementing code for the logic developed through these algorithms and flowcharts.

Database developers should have mastered database programming skills using database languages like Oracle, PL SQL and MS Access which are widely used. Expertise in writing queries and creating tables using Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) is also essential for database developers.

Apart from database programming languages, they should have ability to design logic and understand the concepts of other programming languages which are used in the frontend development process. Sound logical skills and ability to develop code from scratch are also essential attributes required for database developers.

If a person is working with cloud computing then databases like SaaS, IaaS, PaaS, SQL AZURE, Amazon RDS, and Google BigQuery are few that he should have expertise with.

Music Video Directors are responsible for storyboarding and composing a shot-by-shot vision for a music video. They must analyze a song and synchronize their video to the rhythm of its music. Music Video Directors must collaborate with the production crew and actors to create a unified video. A director is responsible for determining how the film moves, sounds and looks, as well as for the performances of the actors. On set, the director takes charge of the artistic and technical aspects of the video. They hold auditions, conduct rehearsals and approve music, costumes, scenery and locations.

Distribution Assistants report directly to the distribution supervisor and may require minimal supervision. In the music industry, Distribution Assistants may be responsible for the distribution of various media, music products, equipment and instruments.

This position may be in charge of preparing items for distribution or shipment. Assistants may also verify incoming shipments or verify distribution is accurately scheduled. They can process payments necessary to order more products to be distributed. Distribution assistants ensure all safety measures and regulations are followed. They may also assist the supervisor with any malfunctions in the distribution process, and generate reports that will be issued to the supervisor for review.

A Distribution Manager is accountable for the strategic planning of transport of products. In the music industry, this position can be responsible for the distribution of various media, music products, equipment, and instruments. Distribution managers monitor the shipping from the distribution centers, to ensure the products are delivered in an accurate and timely manner. A distribution manager is a member of the company’s management team and work with the marketing executives to ensure products reach the market on time, while maintaining a low cost margin. A distribution manager also ensures that safety rules and regulations are met.

Distribution, Sales Reps are sales men and women that work to fulfill orders with established partners, as well as creating relationships with new clients. This position is often given incentive through some kind of commission based on number of sales.

A DJ or Disc Jockey is someone who selects pre-recorded music, and plays it for an audience of people.

A Driver is responsible for the transportation of artists and equipment. S/he must strictly adhere to traffic laws practice cautious driving in order to ensure the safety of passengers and materials. HGV Drivers are responsible for moving heavy goods in large vehicles.

A Duo is a two person musical act. Often include vocal harmonies or other harmonious applications in their performance.

An Editor reviews and approves proofs submitted prior to publication. This position develops a story or content ideas, considering reader or audience appeal, oversees publication production, including artwork, layout, computer typesetting, and printing, ensuring adherence to deadlines and budget requirements, confers with management and editorial staff members regarding placement and emphasis of developing news stories. An Editor assigns topics, events and stories to individual writers or reporters for coverage, then reads, evaluates and edits manuscripts or other materials submitted for publication and confers with authors regarding changes in content, style or organization, or publication.

Editorial assistants provide assistance in all stages of the publication of books, journals, magazines and a broad range of publicity materials. They support senior editorial staff with the administration of the commissioning, planning and production.

An Education/Development Officer is responsible for supporting an organization’s financial well being through fundraising. After making contact with a donor, a development officer must convey the goals of their organization while explaining how a donor’s contribution can help further the mission. Development officers sometimes host or attend events in order to persuade funding sources, meaning they must also be willing to work long nights and weekends.

An audio engineer, also called audio technician, audio technologist or sound technician, is a specialist in a skilled trade that deals with the use of machinery and equipment for the recording, mixing and reproduction of sounds. The field draws on many artistic and vocational areas, including electronics, acoustics, psychoacoustics, and music. An audio technician is proficient with different types of recording media, such as analog tape, digital multitrack recorders and workstations, and computer knowledge. With the advent of the digital age, it is becoming more and more important for the audio technician to be versed in the understanding of software and hardware integration from synchronization to analog to digital transfers.

An Assistant Engineer will assist the recording engineer in operating the soundboard and other electrical equipment during the recording session, usually in the recording studio. They will assist in recording, editing, mixing and mastering sound using a range of specialized mechanical and digital equipment. While usually associated with music production, an Assistant Engineer may work in post production for video and film, live sound, advertising, multimedia, and broadcasting. They are responsible for assisting the recording engineer with setting up the equipment, recording tracks, and mixing. Their work will be directed by the recording engineer. The Assistant Engineer may also be responsible for helping to mix the recorded tracks into the finished product.

An Assistant Engineer may also work on a live music event, especially if it is a large concert or festival. They will need to help operate the soundboard during the performance, and will also be involved in soundcheck and setting up the equipment in advance of a live performance.

Assistant Engineers may also be involved in post production work, such as helping with the final mixes of recordings that have been sent by a studio, band or artist for finishing touches, or in remastering, when they will work on analog masters on vinyl, 8-track or audio cassette, and remaster them for release on CD or other digital media.

An Assistant Engineer may also work on film, TV or video production, assisting in making sure audio tracks are synchronized and equalized with the video. Sometimes they will be required to rerecord existing music, as it is often cheaper for the producer to use a rerecording rather than the original master if they need a particular song or piece of music.

An Assistant Engineer will need experience and training in the production and manipulation of sound through mechanical and digital means. They will need to be familiar with the design, installation, and operation of sound recording, sound reinforcement, or sound broadcasting equipment. They are often musicians, or have a musical background. Experience is very important, and many Assistant Engineers will spend time working on their own music or working for friends and contacts in the music industry. It is a highly technical and skilled job and there are many professional courses available at schools, universities and specialized music schools.

The Front of House Engineer controls the mix for the audience during a live event, and most often operates from the middle of the audience or at the last few rows of the audience from an equipment area known as the “Front Of House Position” or “FOH”. A front of house engineer will often use a variety of processors and effects to provide a particular style to the mix. As with the monitor engineer, front of house engineers are constantly listening to the overall blend in order to make decisions about adjusting the volume and frequency of each instrument or voice on stage. The front of house engineer often makes decisions about which effects devices to use and adjusts their relative levels and blends to meet his or her interpretation of the musical requirements of the song.

The Monitor Engineer’s role is most essential at music events, as opposed to spoken word events. In most cases, each performer on stage has their own individual mix that is custom tailored by the monitor engineer to suit their audio needs. The monitor engineer is then faced with the challenge of pleasing anywhere from four to ten or more musicians with a good mix. At shows with a separate monitor mix position, that mixer is typically located just off-stage, to provide easier communication between the performers and the monitor engineer.

Recording Engineers (sound engineers or audio engineers) usually work in recording studios making high quality sound recordings, mainly for the music and entertainment industry. They need to be able to operate complex electronic equipment to reproduce music, dialogue, sound effects and other audio content to the highest quality. This may be for commercial music CDs or albums, radio, television and theater, commercials or corporate presentations and promotions.

They operate sophisticated electronic equipment to record music, speech, sound effects and other high quality audio content covering all types of sound. A Recording Engineer will set up the performers’ equipment and instruments in the studio, set up and manage the sound levels and dynamics, record the sound, mix tracks on tape and compile the recordings into the final master. They will also keep logs of all the recordings for the archive.

Recording Engineers operate mixing consoles and balance the sound from different sources, often enhancing the recording using effects and processors. They may record directly onto a computer and often use specialized computer software.

Recording Engineers may spend most of their time working in recording studios, but they may also work on location at live concerts, events and productions. They are often employed to record sound at concerts and gigs, sporting arenas, theater productions, or film and video productions. Recording Engineers often work long hours, including evenings and weekends. They need to be very flexible about the hours they work as they depend on the availability of artists and producers. They may need to work away from home or go on tour.

The tasks Recording Engineers carry out in their work include: reproducing and duplicating sound recordings; setting up, testing and adjusting recording equipment, keeping logs of recordings, and compiling recordings into the final master.

A Recording Engineer will need a musical background, as well as experience in sound recording, editing and mixing. Although there are no specific requirements for this role, a qualification in sound engineering is useful. A musical education and experience in the music industry is helpful, especially the ability to compose music and play an instrument. Competition for jobs as Recording Engineers is fierce, and most entrants need to use their initiative. Experience and the ability to make personal contacts in the industry are vital. The industry is going through huge changes due to the development of cheap digital technology. Professional quality recordings can be made using high tech equipment in home studios, resulting in a significant increase in self employment.

There are a number of qualifications on offer for Recording Engineers at all levels, such as music production, music technology, audio technology, media and sound technology, sound engineering and electronics. A lot of Recording Engineers begin their careers as unpaid volunteers to gain experience. Many studios employ young people with few qualifications as assistant recording engineers. Larger commercial studios may require a degree qualification. Assistant sound engineers often begin their careers as runners, carrying out all the basic routine jobs to gain experience, before assisting in sessions.

A Music Engraver offers many different services including music typesetting, note setting, editing and score preparation. Usually using engraving software, an Engraver specializes in transforming handwritten manuscripts into a computer typeset electronic engraving for a successful presentation or publication. Engravers can also draw out music notation by hand.

An Events Assistant is an employee who is often needed at places like concert halls, athletics facilities, civic centers and theaters. The Events Assistant–generally speaking–is responsible for making sure that shows or events scheduled at a location proceed as planned.

An Event Manager is an employee who is often needed at places like concert halls, athletics facilities, civic centers and theaters. The Event Manager–generally speaking–is responsible for making sure that shows or events scheduled at a location proceed as planned.

An event manager is responsible for finding an act, show or organization to hold an event in the facility that he manages. For example, if an event manager works for a conference center, he would work with the local convention and visitors’ bureau to promote the center with groups that may be interested in coming to the city. He also would work with his organization’s marketing team to create promotional materials that promoters, schedulers and planners across the region or country could receive.

When a group, organization or act agrees to hold an event at a facility, the event manager is then responsible to meet with the group holding the event to understand what kinds of amenities need to be in place for the event to be successful. This will likely include several meetings for the event manager, including meetings with different departments within an organization. For example, if a play were to be held at a facility, the event manager would likely need to meet with the production’s audio technicians, those in charge of the lighting and those who are responsible for the set-up of the stage.

An Executive Assistants have the power to make important decisions and policy changes for a company, as well as direct access to the executives in the organization. The Executive Assistant acts as a gatekeeper to the company’s higher-ups, maintains an organized calendar for executive appointments and daily activities, and will maintain an “outsiders” perspective in regards to the macro view of the company.

The Executive Director is also often referred to as an organizations CEO or Chief Executive.
The role of the Executive Director is to strategize, conceptualize and execute company wide policy and business plans. Executive Director will also handle the daily on-goings of the company including everything from staff and committee organization, management, and collaboration.

Facilities managers, also known as administrative services managers, help ensure that organizations operate efficiently by expertly planning and directing building-related services. For example, a facilities manager could allocate office space to different departments, ensure that water pipes are properly maintained, analyze energy expenditures, and procure major equipment. These tasks require a broad training background, for they integrate principles of business administration, information technology, architecture, and engineering.

Job responsibilities at a small organization could be all-encompassing, making the facilities manager essentially an office manager as well. For example, he or she might oversee the installation of a telecommunications system, allocate parking spaces, ensure that a company’s insurance coverage is kept up-to-date, plan for the long-term structural integrity of the building, and assume a variety of other responsibilities.

In contrast, the job responsibilities of a manager at a large organization could be much more specialized. For example, a facilities manager could be devoted to overseeing printing and reproduction services for multiple departments, managing telecommunications, or supervising custodians and security staff. Managers can also specialize in transportation, the acquisition, storage, and disposal of equipment, and a number of other areas. In large companies, it takes all types.

A Festival Organizer responsibilities can include the marketing, signage, audiovisual equipment arrangement, printing and security arrangements, and logistics of a festival.

To the Festival Organizer, an event resembles a product which they also need to market and advertise. The planner comes up with creative ways to promote the products (festivals) so as to make the attendees feel good. A key role of planners is to ensure that the attendees of an event leave with a positive experience.

There are multiple aspects that need to considered and taken care of in organizing a festival to make it all successful. Whether it is about the logistical support or managing the services and supplies, the planner has a crucial role to play, ensuring that no physical detail is overlooked or mismanaged. Other concerns related to organizing a festival include lighting, communication, sound, parking, security, toilet facilities. Most importantly, all of this planning and management tasks need to be performed keeping the budgetary considerations in mind.

A Financial Executive oversees the macro financial operations of a company or corporation. They have final say on the life of old and new accounts, as well as other company investments.

A Finance Assistant or Bookkeeper in the music industry will assist in the day to day work of accounting and business administration for bands, artists, management, independent labels and new media companies in the music and creative industry. They do not need a professional qualification in accountancy, but they may be working towards one. Starting out as a Finance Assistant in a music company can be a good route into developing a wider role. It is often possible to gain excellent experience, especially in dealing with the affairs of smaller musicians, record labels, recording studios and management companies. Possible career development includes becoming a qualified accountant, developing an expertise in licensing and copyright, or becoming involved in business decisions. A smaller music company is likely to offer more opportunity to get involved in a broader range of activities.

A Finance Assistant or Bookkeeper may be employed by a media or music company or by an individual artist or musician. They may also be employed by an accounting practice specializing in the music industry, which may provide services in areas such as tour accounting and payments to artist and crew, tax planning, and royalty accounting and auditing.

The day to day tasks of a Finance Assistant or Bookkeeper may include: producing invoices, credit control, tax preparation and returns, assisting the accountant in preparing monthly reports, accounts payable, accounts receivable, bank reconciliations, record keeping and filing. They may also help in preparing artist profit and loss and royalty accounting. There may be opportunities to work with artists, labels and music companies, including some onsite client work.

A Finance Assistant or Bookkeeper will need to be familiar with specialized accounting and bookkeeping software packages.

A Fundraiser is an integral part of any non-profit organization, as they are responsible for maintaing funding for the organization. The Fundraiser will be expected to maintain relationships with former and current donators, as well reach out and build relationships with new donors. This is a position for a very outgoing and personable personality.

A Fundraising Assistant will help the lead Fundraisers in their attempts to maintain and build relationships with former, current, and potential donors for a non-profit musical organization. The Fundraising Assistant duties may include office administrative work, filing, making copies, running errands, liaising between donors and the organization, and setting up events.

A General Manager can be appropriated to several different roles depending on the size of the organization in which they work. This role is generally reserved at a smaller organization for the CEO (Chief Executive Officer), but may be potentially filled by a company’s COO (Chief Operating Officer), CFO (Chief Financial Officer), or CMO (Chief Marketing Officer). This person handles the profit and loss responsibilities of the company.

A Graduate is an individual who holds a degree or diploma from a university, college, or school. This term can also be used to describe a student who has received a bachelor’s or the first professional degree and is studying for an advanced degree.

Grant writing refers to the practice of completing an application process for funding provided by an institution such as a government department, corporation, foundation or trust. Such application processes are often referred to as either grant “proposals” or “submissions.

A Graphic Artist/Designer working in the music industry may be responsible for designing artist album covers, album leafs, promotional materials, brand logos and other images relating to a certain artist, brand or record label.

Health and Safety Specialists are required to post and uphold federal government standards and regulations for health and safety in the work place.

The house manager is a business manager responsible for managing a theater and its staff.

The Human Resources Assistant assists with the day-to-day operations of the human resources functions and duties. This position has responsibilities in some if not all of the following areas: departmental development, HRIS, employee relations, training and development, benefits, compensation, organization development, executive administration, and employment.

The Human Resources Manager at a music company is the management for all company personnel. This job typically requires a degree in some sort of Business Administration, and a person with a strong ability to manage multiple personalities on a day to day basis. They will handle any complaints or suggestions, and be the mediator for any issues amongst office employees. They are also responsible for observing and maintaining company wide culture among employees.

An Impersonator is one who takes on the personality, stage presence, and music of a known artist, and then performs it as if they were the actual artist.

A Vocal Impersonator is one who takes on the personality, stage presence, and music of a known artist, and then performs it as if they were the actual artist. Often used for sound-a-like recordings.

Charitable giving to human causes on a large scale. Philanthropy must be more than just a charitable donation; it is an effort undertaken by an individual or organization based on an altruistic desire to improve human welfare. Wealthy individuals sometimes establish foundations to facilitate their philanthropic efforts.

An Intern is a student or a trainee who works for little or no pay at a company to gain work experience that they can carry with them in to their next job or career.

An IT Programmer is generally responsible for the design, development and administration of transactional and analytical data structures.

An IT Programmer working in the music industry may be involved in the development of music apps or online music services.

The responsibilities of an IT Programmer may include developing new applications from beginning to end, maintains existing applications, innovating data visualization and presentation techniques, creating code that meets system standards, and analyzing methods to efficiently address software system requirements.

A Label Assistant will assist a record label in a variety of departments and areas in which they require help. This person will work with department professionals and may be asked to do the more mundane or tedious tasks that are imperative to the success of their artists and the company.

A Label Director is responsible for the overall operation of the record label. This person will give the label direction and purpose daily, and serve as the team leader for final decision making.

The Label Manager will supervise and see that all day to day operational tasks are carried out appropriately. A person in this position will be supervised by the Label Director, and will be the liaison between the employees and their superiors.

A Music Librarian classifies and files musical recordings, sheet music, original arrangements, and scores for individual instruments. This position selects music that will accommodate the subject matter of a program. A Music Librarian can also suggest musical selections for cinema, theatre, and radio, issue required music to a Conductor or other studio personnel, or listen to music, using playback equipment, to verify that the quality of recordings meet broadcast standards.

A Licensing, Assistant generally assists in ensuring that the owners of copyrights on musical works are compensated for certain uses of their work, such as broadcasting on Radio and Television. Responsibilities may include monitoring and pursuing license fee collections, processing license fee payments and maintaining synch licensing databases.

A Licensing, Assistant can work in different areas of Music Licensing, such as Synchronization Licensing, which is the licensing of musical works to be synchronized with moving pictures as background in a motion picture, television program, video, DVD, etc.

A Licensing, Manager ensures that the owners of copyrights on musical works are compensated for certain uses of their work, such as broadcasting on Radio and Television. Responsibilities may include overseeing generally department operations such as monitoring and pursuing license fee collections, processing license fee payments and maintaining synch licensing databases.

A Licensing, Manager can work in different areas of Music Licensing, such as Synchronization Licensing, which is the licensing of musical works to be synchronized with moving pictures as background in a motion picture, television program, video, DVD, etc.

Electrical Lighting Technicians (ELT) or simply Lighting Tech., are involved with rigging stage and location sets and controlling artificial, electric lights for art and entertainment venues (theater or live music venues) or in video, television, or film production. In a theater production, lighting technicians work under the lighting designer and master electrician. In video, television, and film productions, lighting technicians work under the direction of the Gaffer or Chief Lighting Technician whom takes their direction from the cinematographer. In live music, lighting technicians work under the Lighting Director. All heads of department report to the production manager.

Electrical Lighting Technicians (ELT) or simply Lighting Tech., are involved with rigging stage and location sets and controlling artificial, electric lights for art and entertainment venues (theater or live music venues) or in video, television, or film production. In a theater production, lighting technicians work under the lighting designer and master electrician. In video, television, and film productions, lighting technicians work under the direction of the Gaffer or Chief Lighting Technician whom takes their direction from the cinematographer. In live music, lighting technicians work under the Lighting Director. All heads of department report to the production manager.

A Luthier makes or repairs any type of String Instrument. The craft of making string instruments, or lutherie, is commonly divided into two main categories: makers of stringed instruments that are plucked or strummed and makers of stringed instruments that are bowed.

A lyricist creates words that are sung to a particular tune. Sometimes the lyricist writes the words first and a composer sets them to music, while other times the composer already has written the music and seeks a lyricist to fit words into the piece.

A make-up artist (or ‘makeup artist’) is an artist whose medium is the human body, applying makeup and prosthetics for theatrical, television, film, fashion, magazines and other similar productions including all aspects of the modeling industry.

Music Manufacturing includes providing the CD, vinyl, or DVD for an artist release, creating and pressing the master, stamping reproductions, finishing with art designing and packaging, and distribution.

A Marketing Analyst will compile data based on consumer groups, target markets, past campaigns, and other company data to help analyze and recommend new marketing campaigns or techniques for the company.

A Marketing Assistant is responsible for helping to come up with new marketing concepts, working with the creative department on images and advertisements, develop marketing strategies and plans, and present findings to company executives.

A Marketing Manager is responsible for coming up with marketing concepts, working with the creative department on images and advertisements, develop marketing strategies and plans, and present findings to company executives. It is a management position, so this person will likely have a college degree in Marketing and/or several years of experience in Marketing.

A Mastering Engineer is one skilled in the practice of taking audio (typically musical content) that has been previously mixed in either the analog or digital domain as mono, stereo, or multichannel formats and preparing it for use in distribution, whether by physical media such as a CD, vinyl record, or as some method of streaming audio.

An MC can be either a lyricist, rapper, or the host of an event. Often the center of attention on stage, and almost always holding the microphone.

The Media Manager uses digital media including social, mobile, video, etc. to boost company earnings, build relationships with consumers and affiliates, and exploit the company in the digital world. This person will tend to the website/s and act as lead administrator of a company’s digital media.

The Media Relations / PR Assistant position is an entry level position that will work with managers and administrators to maintain that daily tasks are fulfilled, and the office runs smoothly. This person will likely maintain the client database, compile press kits, assemble powerpoint presentations, and other administrative office duties.

The Media Relations / PR Manager position runs the Public Relations and Media Relations arms of a company. They are responsible for maintaining the current state of the department, as well as bring in new ideas to support it’s growth. They will be the liaison between the company and it’s relationships with media outlets.

A Membership Representative is responsible for acting as a liaison between members and the parent company. They are the ears, eyes, and voice for the company and the clients, and are expected to mediate as well as voice their opinions based on company and member concerns.

Music merchandisers work on the business side of the music industry, combining their love for music with a practical application. Individuals with a background in sales and marketing may have a head start in this career.

With possible career opportunities in talent agencies, management firms, record companies and public relations offices, music merchandisers use their knowledge of the music business to promote the sales of musical artists and their products as well as instruments, sheet music and music equipment. Merchandisers who work solely with musical products may also be responsible for distribution of products to certain geographic areas. Music industry jobs can be more plentiful in bigger cities that may be known for having a thriving entertainment industry, such as Los Angeles, Nashville, New York or Miami.

A music merchandiser may develop and implement marketing plans for the artists they work with or the products they are promoting. As part of these plans, merchandisers may schedule promotional events and performances and set up displays at venues or stores. Reading music industry publications may be a routine part of the job in order to stay abreast of industry current events that can impact clients. At any point during the promotional process, merchandisers may meet with, discuss or report on plans with different departments in their company, talent, management or industry executives.

A Music Merchandiser Assistant may help develop and implement marketing plans for the artists they work with or the products they are promoting. As part of these plans, merchandisers may schedule promotional events and performances and set up displays at venues or stores. Reading music industry publications may be a routine part of the job in order to stay abreast of industry current events that can impact clients. At any point during the promotional process, merchandisers may meet with, discuss or report on plans with different departments in their company, talent, management or industry executives.

Music Attorneys practice in the entertainment law field. Their job usually includes representing musicians by putting together deals, negotiating and reviewing contracts and protecting against copyright infringement. Music attorneys can work in law firms that have entertainment law practices, or as in-house counsel at record label and publishing companies.

Music Attorney, Assistants and Paralegals work in the entertainment law field.

Their job usually includes assisting in the representation of musicians by putting together deals, negotiating and reviewing contracts and protecting against copyright infringement. Music Attorney Assistants can work in law firms that have entertainment law practices, or at record label and publishing companies.

A Music Director may be the director of an orchestra, the director of music for a film, the director of music at a radio station, the head of the music department in a school, the co-ordinator of the musical ensembles in a university or college (but not usually the head of the academic music department), the head bandmaster of a military band, the head organist and choirmaster of a church, or an Organist and Master of the Choristers. Music Directors are generally responsible for choosing music to be played and directing the performances of musicians.

A Music Director, Assistant may assist the music director of an orchestra, the director of music for a film, the director of music at a radio station, the head of the music department in a school, the co-ordinator of the musical ensembles in a university or college (but not usually the head of the academic music department), the head bandmaster of a military band, the head organist and choirmaster of a church, or an Organist and Master of the Choristers. This position is generally responsible for assisting in the choosing of music to be played and the direction of musical performances.

 

In Film and Television, a Music Editor matches music to visual scenes in a manner that enhances the feel and impact of a film. They make sure the music is in tempo with the scenes and that the music is an enhancement and not a distraction.

A music ensemble/band is a group of musicians that have come together to perform. Often hired by bars, venues, or individuals for parties. This can include cover bands, orchestras, symphonies, jazz groups, rock bands, etc.

Music journalists write news stories about singers, musicians and the music industry for all types and sizes of publications, ranging from specialty outlets, including large magazines to local and regional newspapers. Like all journalists, they are expected to adhere to certain ethical and research standards.

A Music Publishing Assistant is generally responsible for assisting in ensuring the songwriters and composers receive payment when their compositions are used commercially.

Through an agreement called a publishing contract, a songwriter or composer “assigns” the copyright of their composition to a publishing company. In return, the company licenses compositions, helps monitor where compositions are used, collects royalties and distributes them to the composers. They also secure commissions for music and promote existing compositions to recording artists, film and television.

Responsibilities may include reviewing drafts of composer agreements and other music documents prepared by attorneys for various Film/TV Productions, reviewing and digesting information pertinent to publishing deals, i.e., what rights have been acquired, any restrictions, exclusivities and/or special instructions.

A Music Publishing Manager is generally responsible for ensuring that songwriters and composers receive payment when their compositions are used commercially.

Through an agreement called a publishing contract, a songwriter or composer “assigns” the copyright of their composition to a publishing company. In return, the company licenses compositions, helps monitor where compositions are used, collects royalties and distributes them to the composers. They also secure commissions for music and promote existing compositions to recording artists, film and television.

Responsibilities may include overseeing department operations such as reviewing drafts of composer agreements and other music documents prepared by attorneys for various Film/TV Productions, and reviewing and digesting information pertinent to publishing deals, i.e., what rights have been acquired, any restrictions, exclusivities and/or special instructions.

A Music Software Engineer develops software that runs programs for music production, composing, notation, music apps or online music services.

An Audio Software Engineer specifically develops the software that runs programs for the gaming industry, websites, television, video and radio stations. As the digital sound movement completely replaces analog transmission of sound, software development is more important than ever. New hardware devices require ever-increasing software programs to handle the variety of audio that artists and businesses transmit.

Typically, a Music Supervisor handles the process of choosing, negotiating, and incorporating pieces of music into visual media (such as a television show or movie), acting as a liaison between the creative and business ends of this process. This position is most active within media based industries, including live events, television, film, advertising, theatre, and video gaming. Music supervisors may work within production companies, film studios, networks, music supervision companies, or do freelance work.

A Music Teacher’s responsibilities can include providing instruction in playing an instrument, teaching music theory and site reading, and training students in live performance. Music Teachers can instruct the elementary, high school or collegiate levels, or give private music lessons. While Music Teachers usually offer students the basic principles of music, many students move on to singing or playing simple or complex instruments.

Music Technologists are experts in producing music using technology. They need to be enthusiasts for electronic sound and experts in using the software and equipment. Many Music Technologists work from home and some work out of a studio, using equipment such as samplers, sequencers, synthesizers, MIDI, drum machines and computers. As well as working in the music industry they may work in film and TV or in the computer games industry.

For a career in electronic music production it is essential to learn how to use the hardware and software, and there are many courses available at all levels. While technical music production skills are essential, musical talent comes in to play when choosing the elements to create the music.

To have a successful career in electronic music production a Music Technologist must know the music industry and keep abreast of trends while being cutting edge and commercial.

Music Technologists may secure a recording contract, work in other fields such as radio, television, advertising, software or work freelance across several industries. Learning through hands on experience can be a successful career path, for example some producers have started as DJs who wanted to remix songs more effectively for their work.

Making a ‘mix tape’ of tunes or remixing already established songs and sending it to potential employers is one tried and tested route into the industry. Some electronic producers will also work as sound engineers or record producers.

A Music Therapist plans, organizes, and directs medically prescribed music therapy activities as part of mental and physical health care and treatment of patients. This position is responsible for influencing behavioral and psychological changes leading to restoration, maintenance, and improvement of health and increased comprehension of self, environment, and physical ability.

A musician is someone who has studied and performs on one or more instruments. Often needed as a fill-in for a symphony orchestra, or a rock band member. Sessions Musicians are often versatile artists used primarily for recording sessions in recording studios.

In general, a Musicologist studies music. There are a number of branches of musicology, ranging from music theory to comparative musicology, in which the musicologist compares and contrasts the music of different cultures. Many colleges offer some form of a musicology degree, and some musicologists are also accomplished musicians with a deep understanding of their art. Musicologists can teach courses in drama, music, and the arts including fine and applied art, such as painting and sculpture, or design and crafts.

The New Media Assistant will help with all inter-office managerial duties. They are responsible for maintaining company databases, and relationships with clients. The Assistant position is an entry level position.

The New Media Manager is responsible for managing accounts in social media, video sites, and any other newer media used by the company. They are required to stay on the cutting edge of all new media, and integrate the company as soon as it seems pertinent.

An Office Manager oversees the needs and daily operations of a music industry business’ office. They will order office supplies, make sure office bills are payed on time, and delegate responsibilities for office maintenance to employees.

An Operations Manager oversees, designs, and redesigns business operations to be as efficient as it can be. Their job is to ensure safety and efficiency in workplace operations.

An Assistant Operations Manager helps to oversee, design, and redesign business operations to be as efficient as possible. Their job is to assist in ensuring safety and efficiency in workplace operations.

The Orchestra Assistant is responsible for assisting the Orchestra Manager. Responsibilities may include arranging orchestra concert tours, as well as dealing with any problems that arise for the orchestra, including the late arrival of instruments to an auditorium, or a musician becoming ill and needing a replacement. He or she may also need to negotiate contracts for any guest soloists and/or guest conductors who will be performing with the orchestra.

The Orchestra Manager is responsible for arranging orchestra concert tours, as well as dealing with any problems that arise for the orchestra, including the late arrival of instruments to an auditorium, or a musician becoming ill and needing a replacement. He or she may also need to negotiate contracts for any guest soloists and/or guest conductors who will be performing with the orchestra.

Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a surface (support base). The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes, can be used. Paintings may have for their support such surfaces as walls, paper, canvas, wood, glass, lacquer, clay, leaf, copper or concrete, and may incorporate multiple other materials including sand, clay, paper, gold leaf as well as objects.

A Personal Assistant will help to provide assistance in the daily life of another individual. Although this service could benefit just about anyone, it is often a position sought to be filled for business executives and higher ups in big companies. This job is not for the feint of heart, and often requires a strong backbone and work ethic by those who choose to enter this field.

Photographers use cameras to create pictures for artistic, news or commercial purposes. In the music industry, photographers can be responsible for capturing performances and photographing artists for CDs and promotional materials.

A Presenter is responsible for hosting events, as well as broadcast programs. A broadcast presenter is the public face – or voice – of programs broadcasted on television, radio and the internet. They work on a variety of platforms including national, regional, satellite and cable television, online or radio, but their role is always to entertain and inform their audiences by presenting information and/or entertainment in an accessible and attractive way.

The Press Office Assistant carries out all of the necessary tasks as designated by the office administrators and executives. This includes office administration, as well as reviewing editorials and reading over documents for editing.

The Press Office Director has several duties including the maintenance of quality control for outgoing editorials and other print, managing and hiring of office staff, build and maintain relationships with other media outlets, and come up with new and improved strategies to boost and grow the business.

Recording industry Producers organize all aspects of recording music. Many operate in the traditional way of working with performers in a recording studio with the assistance of a sound engineer. Others use their own equipment to try out ideas but use a commercial recording studio for the final recording. With changes in technology, an increasing number of people are becoming involved in producing their own music.

Some experienced sound engineers become recording industry Producers. Musicians and disc jockeys who have contacts in the music industry and have the technical expertise may also move into record production.

The work of a record Producer may include: selecting music and contacting musicians, identifying music with commercial potential, setting the budget and recording schedule, negotiating and signing contracts with performers and with the artists and repertoire (A&R) departments of music publishers or record companies, engineering the recording, delivering the product to the A&R department of the company, all within budget and on schedule.

The collaborative nature of music production means that Producers work with a wide variety of people, including performers, writers, arrangers, lawyers, accountants and distributors. Hours are long and irregular, often including evenings and weekends.

Many Producers work on a freelance basis and are paid a flat fee for recording sessions, possibly with an agreed percentage (often between three and four percent) of the income from future sales, so income can vary from next to nothing to tens of thousands of dollars. Producers may also be employed by a record label or music production company.

A Producer Assistant helps a Producer to oversee and manage the recording (i.e. “production”) of an artist’s music. This position’s responsibilities include but are not limited to helping to gather ideas for a project, assisting in selecting songs and/or musicians, coaching artists and musicians in the studio, controlling the recording sessions under the Producers direction, and helping to mix and master music.

A Production Assistant, also known as a PA, is a job title used in filmmaking and television for a person responsible for various aspects of a production. Production assistants on films are sometimes attached to individual actors or filmmakers. The production assistant does just about anything and everything, from getting coffee to making script copies to shuttling crew or equipment around town as needed. How much a production assistant does really depends on the budget of the production as well as how much faith his/her superiors have in their abilities.

The Production Coordinator serves under the production manager, producer or UPM to coordinate the various groups and personnel that come together in filmmaking to a movie and video production to make a television show. It is a supervisory position to the Production assistant staff. The position requires adept organizational skills, resourcefulness and the ability to handle a multitude of tasks simultaneously under often high-pressure situations. The POC serves as the gatekeeper of company policy and is usually responsible for ensuring the rest of the production television crew follows the requirements of the Production Company or Studio.

A Music Professor teaches Music Theory, Music Composition, or their instrument of expertise (including voice) in college music programs across the country, including music conservatories, colleges and universities.

A Professor of Music Business provides students with a broad overview of the music business and how various segments of the industry operate on a day-to-day basis. This position can also teach a range of more specific subjects including Artist Management, Music Distribution, Concert Touring, and Music Marketing.

A Program Director is generally responsible for the development and management of educational or performance programs.

Project Managers are responsible for seeing a project through from beginning to it’s completion. They are responsible for maintaining deadlines and goals, and achieving them.

A Promoter organizes entertainment events such as concerts, nightclub parties or sporting events in any type of venue. Their responsibilities require skills in several areas–advertising, public relations, finance, entertainment business sense, innovation and intuition.

Generally, a promoter’s job is to conceive an event, hire the personnel needed to make it happen, choose an appropriate venue, choose a date, advertise the event, plan its logistics (every event requires a detailed itinerary of when things are supposed to happen) and then ensure those events happen as planned.

Promotions Assistants handle duties that are essential to the maintenance of the office, and the daily productivity in a Promotions department. They are likely to wear many hats and might be responsible for handling things like client inquiries, taking notes at staff meetings, maintaing schedules and proofreading advertisements.

The Promotions Director is a managerial position that requires a versatile and savvy person to fill the role. They are in charge of assisting in the development and execution of all company promotional campaigns in advertising and marketing. The Promotions Director is responsible for assembling and monitoring his/her team within the department, and ensuring that all departmental goals are executed thoroughly. Will work with the managers and executives in other company departments to achieve company wide goals.

Promotions Dept. Coordinator is an upper level position for someone with experience in both managerial work and promotions. They will be required to manage the Promotions Department staff, and ensure that the department runs smoothly on a daily basis. Responsibilities include brainstorming new ideas for promotional campaigns, developing a team and gathering staff for on-going and new campaigns, and executing them successfully.

The Radio Station Manager has the responsibility for the day-to-day operation of the station including managing the various departments, scheduling on and off air staff, dealing with promotions and other advertising issues as well as ensuring that the station follows are regulations and guidelines.

The station manager is also the liaison between the station owners and the employees and works to make sure that all employees are following the goals of the owners with regards to the type of station and level of professionalism.

Radio producers are primarily responsible for creating a radio show.

They are involved in the entire process, right from the conceptualization to the final distribution. Radio producers generate ideas, research and develop the content, select the audio, and also contact potential contributors and interviewees. In addition, they are in charge of designing the schedule, handling the recording and editing, and also managing budgets.

Radio producers interact with a lot of people and work to get the resources and necessary equipment. They may be required to use technology for the purposes of editing and production. The job role also involves various other duties like maintaining the show time and format, arranging for guests, as well as screening or briefing callers.

Radio producers work for both national and independent radio stations. They collaborate with presenters, broadcasting assistants, engineers, IT staff, and DJs. They take care of the entire commercial and business aspects of a program, and also make sure that safety and health standards are maintained.

A Radio Production Assistant supports the day-to-day operations of a radio show, which can include sound production and audio engineering, radio programming, liaising with any sponsors and advertisers and providing DJs with scripts if there are any competitions to mention, specific sponsors’ slogans and adverts, etc.

A Radio Programmer is someone who schedules the content which is broadcast on a radio station. Program directors actually shape the nature of the content, determining what kind of content they want to broadcast, while other types of radio programmers are responsible for ensuring that broadcasts run smoothly and that no dead air occurs during broadcast periods. Training in this aspect of the profession is available at a number of colleges, universities, and technical schools, and people can be employed in many branches of the radio industry.

Programming in general is a very important part of the broadcast media, whether the media is radio or television. Every minute of a program has to be carefully planned and structured to avoid gaps which cause silence on the air, prevent program overruns, and ensure that the content is appealing to listeners and viewers. A radio programmer determines what goes on the air, when it airs, and how the programming of a station will be structured.

Radio programmers may allocate resources, determining the schedule for hosts, radio personalities, and other staffers. They also source program material from other locations; for example, a community radio station may buy syndicated content and arrange to receive it by satellite. The radio programmer monitors the timing on pre-recorded programs to ensure that it fits into the schedule, and monitors live broadcasts to be available to jump in to deal with programs which can range from dead air caused by equipment malfunctions to unexpected profanity from a guest.

Radio Promotions staff are responsible for developing and implementing creative promotions initiatives for radio and/or online services to ensure maximum publicity.

This includes event branding, merchandising, major outside broadcasts and forging links with diverse communities across the county.

A promotions manager must have critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to be able to create promotions and analyze campaign data. Although artistic abilities are not necessary, creativity is a must. Promotions managers must also be able to work with and manage a team. As a promotions manager, you must be able to stay cool under pressure because the nature of the work includes managing people, multiple projects and ongoing deadlines.

Radio Talent may refer to On-Air Personalities, or DJs.

Because music provides only a fraction of the incentive for listeners to tune in, an On-Air Personality must be able to entertain an audience. They must equip themselves with a knack for conversation. S/he will frequently conduct live interviews with celebrities, local event coordinators, and listeners. Pleasing clients with catchy, infectious ads also consumes a large amount of an on-air personality’s work day.

On-Air Personalities are usually responsible to conducting programming as well. Each radio station follows a format. An on-air personality must adhere to this format, while taking into consideration common song requests from listeners.

Local businesses or event coordinators often request a radio presence for promotional purposes. An on-air personality may broadcast live from these events, or just make an appearance.

The Receptionist / Front Desk position can be an entry level position for someone who is highly organized, and personable. In an office building, this will be the first person to receive phone calls, mail, visitors, and business associates, and should be able to make great first impressions.

A Recruiter is someone who actively seeks talent for a company. This can be an in-house position, but is often outsourced to another company with more experience in finding the right fit for newly open positions at an organization.

Will perform all music throughout rehearsals, which is often a reduction of the orchestral score. This allows choirs, actors, vocalists, etc. to continue their rehearsals with a broke down musical accompaniment.

A Remixer recombines audio tracks or channels from a recording to produce a new or modified audio recording.

Skilled worker who mends or repairs musical instruments and tools.

A Répétiteur is responsible for coaching singers and playing the piano for music and production rehearsals. When coaching solo singers or choir members, the répétiteur will take on a number of the roles of a vocal coach: advising singers on how to improve their pitch and pronunciation, and correcting note or phrasing errors.

Repetiteurs are skilled musicians who have strong sight-reading and score reading skills. In addition to being able to sight read piano parts, a répétiteur can “fake” an orchestral reduction by reading from a large open score of all of the instruments and voice parts. Répétiteurs are also skilled in following the directions of a conductor, in terms of changing the tempo, pausing, or adding other nuances.

A Researcher is someone who does research on a particular project or task for a company.

A Retail Sales Assistant is a sales associate position. This can be entry-level, or senior-level depending on the required experience. This person is responsible for building and maintaining relationships with customers, and will often work on a base + commission type of salary.

A Retail Sales Manager is required to coordinate the sales associates, and monitor daily sales. This person is responsible for the smooth running of the retail store, managing employees, and reaching sales goals.

A Road Manager is responsible for all the background work that goes on during a tour. This person prepares the route that the tour will take to get to the next destination. This position is also responsible for checking on the venue; making sure that the lighting and sound qualities are satisfactory, making sure bands and associates have food and lodging. The Road Manager is also responsible for keeping the band and crew working together, solving interpersonal conflicts, if necessary.

A Royalty Accounts Assistant is generally responsible for assisting in ensuring that licensing deals are tracked and that payments are timely and in accordance with agreements. This position is responsible for the processing of artist royalties related to these agreements.

Responsibilities may include maintaining writer and publisher royalty accounts, assisting with distribution mailings, processing payments, voids and reissues, releasing withheld monies, setting up charges, placing withholds, and legal department correspondence.

A Royalty Accounts Director is generally responsible for ensuring that licensing deals are tracked and that payments are timely and in accordance with agreements. This position is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the processing of artist royalties related to these agreements.

A Sales Executive is responsible for managing the sales department of a company or corporation. Their primary responsibilities are to control the hiring and firing of employees, project and reach company wide sales goals, and oversee the day to day operations of the sales department including it’s finances. This position may require a college degree in business or finance due to the requirements of the job.

A Sales Rep is the liaison between the company and it’s clients. They are responsible for maintaining relationships with current clients, and building relationships with new clients. Their primary responsibility is to make and manage the sales of the company’s product.

A Sales Assistant is someone who works with the Sales Lead or Sales Representative to help settle and process sales. This will be an entry level position that could potentially lead to a more permanent position as a Sales Representative.

The Sales Director is responsible for managing the sales department, divvying up the work within the department amongst employees, assessing employee performance, and reporting on those observations to their superiors.

Scenography relates to the study and practice of design for performance.

The role of a security guard is to safeguard, patrol, and monitor any theft or violence in the premises where his duty has been assigned. For a large organization, the duties of security guards are directed by a higher security director, while he may work alone for small buildings. In both cases, the security guard is responsible for serving his employer by providing safety against any law violator, and determining any sort of disturbance that will incur losses to the client. A Bodyguard handles the personal safety of a musical artist/group or celebrity, handling entry and exit routes at venues, and regulating crowds, fans, and stalkers.

Professional Singers or Vocalists perform live in front of an audience or make recordings for broadcast, CD or download. They interpret music by using their knowledge of voice production, melody, harmony, and rhythm. They might do session work for backing tracks, advertisements and films. They may sing alone as a soloist, work with a group of musicians or sing with others in a choir. They may sing classical music, pop, ballads or in musical shows.

Singers may specialize in one of many fields such as folk, opera, classical or rock. Classical Singers are categorized by their voice range, usually as soprano, contralto, tenor, baritone, or bass. They usually perform in operas or concerts and may be part of a choral group. Classical Singers may perform in concerts, theaters, clubs, films, television, and radio.

Popular Singers perform different types of music such as jazz, soul, rock, blues, or country and western. They may sing as lead Singers or band members. They may accompany themselves on an instrument such as a guitar or piano or sing with a band or orchestra. Some Singers are singer-songwriters and write songs, or they may compose music. Popular Singers perform on stage, in musicals, on television, in nightclubs, and in television commercials.

Singers of sacred music usually sing in churches and other religious institutions, either solo or in a choral group. They may also perform on television or radio or in concert.

A solo artist may work with an orchestra, an accompanist or their own equipment, such as backing tracks or a musical instrument. Pop Singers may pay session musicians to play the music, or perform at venues that have a house band.

Singers work long and irregular hours, practicing, rehearsing and performing. Evening and weekend work is normal, and there may be a considerable amount of travel. They may work in a variety of environments, from indoor concert halls and night clubs to outdoor venues such as parks or the gardens of stately homes. Singers rarely receive a fixed salary and are usually paid on a concert or gig basis. Payment depends on the venue and experience of the Singer.

A good voice and a strong musical sense are the most important requirements for a Singer. While some Singers have naturally good voices, most are trained. Singers often start out by singing in a church or with a small band. Although the field is competitive, those with a good voice and musical sense can often find work.

Singers generally start training when their voices mature, but although voice training is an asset for Singers, it is possible to have a singing career without formal training. Training requirements depend on the field of music. Many rock and folk Singers rely on on the job training.

Some Singers choose to work as teachers in schools or privately while at the same time developing their own singing career. Or they may follow a career path as a singing teacher. Teaching in colleges or conservatories usually requires a postgraduate degree in music and several years of training.

Singers, along with other musicians, are increasingly making use of technology and social networking sites on the internet to produce and promote their work and develop their careers.

A vocalist that also writes songs. Often will write both the lyrics and music (chord progressions), but may just do one or the other, and collaborate with other songwriters.

The Social Media Specialist is responsible for managing, expanding, and coordinating all social media for the company. They will be the liaison between the company and it’s social media networks.

A Software Engineer applies computer science, engineering, and math to design, develop, and test software.

Software engineers first analyze users’ needs. Then they design, construct, test, and maintain the needed software or systems. In programming, or coding, they tell a computer, line by line, how to function. They also solve any problems that arise. They must possess strong coding skills, but are more likely to develop algorithms and solve problems than write code.

Computer applications software engineers design, construct, and maintain computer programs based on what people need. They can develop a program for just one person or for many people to use separately.

Computer systems software engineers construct and maintain computer programs for companies. For example, they might develop programs that do recordkeeping and payroll. They might also set up an “intranet”—an internal and secure computer network—for a company. Many software engineers work for companies that make or install new and more advanced computer systems.

A Music Software Engineer develops software that runs programs for music production, composing, notation, music apps or online music services.

An Audio Software Engineer specifically develops the software that runs programs for the gaming industry, websites, television, video and radio stations. As the digital sound movement completely replaces analog transmission of sound, software development is more important than ever. New hardware devices require ever-increasing software programs to handle the variety of audio that artists and businesses transmit.

Songwriters are responsible for creating musical pieces for a variety of uses, including advertising, television, film, video games, plays, operas, ballets and recording artists. Additionally, songwriters may write music for their own personal use and performance.

The Sound Designer plans and provides the sound effects in the play. The composer writes any original music the show may require. All the music and/or effects in a play considered as a whole make up the “soundscape.” In addition to the sounds of the words spoken by the actors, a play may also call for sound effects to recreate lifelike noises or use music or abstract and unidentifiable sounds to support the drama.

In the world of theater, a stage manager is a master of organization and communication. A stage manager is in charge of: Organizing rehearsal schedules, keeping track of the actors’ movements while onstage (also called blocking), facilitating rehearsals so that they run smoothly, recording timing of lighting, sound and set changes, calling cues for actors, assisting the director during rehearsals, communicating with cast and crew. The ultimate goal of the stage manager is to ensure that the director’s vision of the production is brought to life. Once the show is up and running, the stage manager is responsible for maintaining the overall quality of the production.

The Stage Manager Assistant is responsible for helping the stage manager organize rehearsal schedules, keep track of the actors’ movements while onstage (also called blocking), facilitate rehearsals so that they run smoothly, record timing of lighting, sound and set changes, call cues for actors, assist the director during rehearsals, and communicate with cast and crew. This position is also responsible for assisting in maintaining the overall quality of a production.

A woman/man who receives or entertains guests.

A Street Team is an organized group of people, often students, who will go around a specified area and promote an event, band, artist, or company by handing out flyers, swag, and/or putting up posters.

A Studio Manager in the music industry makes sure that the studio is organized in terms of bookings, equipment and administration. They are often involved in the business side of the operations, making sure they keep existing clients satisfied and attract new business to the recording studio.

Very often recording Studio Managers will be experienced musicians or producers. They need to be in touch with what is happening in the music industry and all the changes that are taking place in terms of new music technology and equipment as well as trends in how people record and produce music. The more contacts a Studio Manager has in the music business the better the recording studio’s chances of commercial success.

The Studio Manager may also be the owner of the recording studio and is the person responsible for running the business. Studio Managers are responsible for booking acts to record at the studio, scheduling engineers, marketing the studio, and budgetary accounting. They are responsible for providing for all the necessary equipment and facilities required of a professional recording studio. Studio Managers also act as the liaison between engineers and clients, ensuring client satisfaction and handling all financial transactions with clients.

A Studio Manager Assistant is a position often occupied by current production students, or recent college graduates. This is a job that will allow for great experience in a recording environment, and also with the day to day operations of a recording studio.

A Stylist can be responsible for designing and/or implementing the wardrobe, hair style, and overall physical image of actors in a production.

A Subscription Sales representative is responsible for selling products based on some kind of recurring payment. This may be anything from a monthly magazine to an internet musical service subscription.

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is an integrated approach to planning, implementing and controlling the flow of information, materials and services from raw material and component suppliers through the manufacturing of the finished product for ultimate distribution to the end customer. It includes the systematic integration of processes for demand planning, customer relationship collaboration, order fulfillment/delivery, product/service launch, manufacturing/operations planning and control, supplier relationship collaboration, life cycle support, and reverse logistics and their associated risks. These processes, which employ a combination of people, systems and technology, can be performed by the firm itself or in collaboration with external supply chain partners.

Supply chain management is strategic in orientation and recognizes that the competitive strength of a firm is not only determined by its products but also by the operations and activities that place the products into customers’ hands and provide supporting services. Efficient and effective supply chain management enhances firm performance and adds value by increasing asset utilization to gain competitive market advantage. The responsiveness and efficiency of a company’s supply chain arising from its design and management is integral to the firm’s ability to successfully compete in the global marketplace.

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is an integrated approach to planning, implementing and controlling the flow of information, materials and services from raw material and component suppliers through the manufacturing of the finished product for ultimate distribution to the end customer. It includes the systematic integration of processes for demand planning, customer relationship collaboration, order fulfillment/delivery, product/service launch, manufacturing/operations planning and control, supplier relationship collaboration, life cycle support, and reverse logistics and their associated risks. These processes, which employ a combination of people, systems and technology, can be performed by the firm itself or in collaboration with external supply chain partners.

Supply chain management is strategic in orientation and recognizes that the competitive strength of a firm is not only determined by its products but also by the operations and activities that place the products into customers’ hands and provide supporting services. Efficient and effective supply chain management enhances firm performance and adds value by increasing asset utilization to gain competitive market advantage. The responsiveness and efficiency of a company’s supply chain arising from its design and management is integral to the firm’s ability to successfully compete in the global marketplace.

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is an integrated approach to planning, implementing and controlling the flow of information, materials and services from raw material and component suppliers through the manufacturing of the finished product for ultimate distribution to the end customer. It includes the systematic integration of processes for demand planning, customer relationship collaboration, order fulfillment/delivery, product/service launch, manufacturing/operations planning and control, supplier relationship collaboration, life cycle support, and reverse logistics and their associated risks. These processes, which employ a combination of people, systems and technology, can be performed by the firm itself or in collaboration with external supply chain partners.

Supply chain management is strategic in orientation and recognizes that the competitive strength of a firm is not only determined by its products but also by the operations and activities that place the products into customers’ hands and provide supporting services. Efficient and effective supply chain management enhances firm performance and adds value by increasing asset utilization to gain competitive market advantage. The responsiveness and efficiency of a company’s supply chain arising from its design and management is integral to the firm’s ability to successfully compete in the global marketplace.

A Technical Director’s job is to make sure the technical equipment in a theater or venue is functional, maintained and safe; the technical director is responsible for the overall organization of the technical production process.

Duties included are generating necessary working drawings for construction (in conjunction with a drafts person, if there is one); budget estimations and maintaining of accounts; materials research and purchasing; scheduling and supervising build crews; coordinating put-ins; handling conflicts that arise between different departments; and organizing the strike and clean-up for that production.

Technical Director can also refer to the in-house chief designer/master carpenter for a smaller theater company.

Sound Technicians set up, operate and maintain technical equipment to amplify, enhance, record, mix or reproduce sound. They work from studios or on location and at live events in a variety of venues.

In the music industry, experienced and well qualified Sound Technicians are an essential part of any live performance. As well as their technical knowledge and knowledge of the equipment it is important they have a good understanding of the specific requirements of the music being performed. For example, the requirements of an opera performance will be different from those of house music in a club.

It requires years of study and practice, a great deal of musical knowledge, and great communication skills to be a good Sound Technician in the music industry. When bands find a technician they like, it is very common for them to hire them on a permanent or exclusive basis.

Sound Technician’s tasks may include: setting up, testing and operating sound equipment, placing and adjusting microphones, and maintaining and repairing sound equipment. During recording, Sound Technicians will monitor the sound and balance and mix it as necessary.

Sound Technicians seldom work regular hours. Work can start very early and finish late. Night and weekend work is common. Technicians working in recording studios have to work hours that suit the artists they are recording.

Sound Technicians may be employed in specialized music departments in colleges or schools. They will work closely with music students and IT staff, providing technical assistance and maintenance for music recording studios, sound design studios, electronic music studios, computer/MIDI based music composition workstations and any miscellaneous sound needs of the department. They may also be responsible for supervising live recordings and supporting music and drama presentations. In addition, the Sound Technician will be responsible for troubleshooting students’ technical problems, and providing support and instruction in the use of equipment.

In television, film or radio Sound Technicians work alongside numerous other technicians and production staff in a studio or on outside broadcast events. Outside broadcast could involve working anywhere from a racecourse to a rock festival. Their main task is to make sure that any sound coming from a live or taped source is processed as clearly as possible. They may work with live and recorded sound, and their work can include recording and balancing speech for radio plays or discussions, and playing music or sound effects in a live program.

A Backline Technician provides technical support for live performances. Each artist, orchestra or band is different and will have different needs, so the work can be varied. They will need to be comfortable with different types of equipment and different setups. Depending on the musicians and the type of event the Technician is working on they may be responsible for a range of road crew tasks or they may specialize in a particular area, such as percussion or strings. For a small scale performance there may be one Backline Technician who is expected to deal with everything. For a larger scale performance there may be a number of Backline Technicians with different responsibilities. Some Backline Technicians specialize in instruments generally, or specific types of instruments.

For example a sound technician specializing in drums will build the drum kit, soundcheck it with the sound team, make sure the drummer is happy with the setup and be responsible for looking after the kit while on tour. They will tune the drums and sometimes sit next to the drum riser for the performance, making any necessary adjustments. Others technicians specialize in the sound itself, or may be more generalized and have a range of responsibilities.

The responsibilities of a Backline Technician may include unloading and setting up the instruments and equipment. Backline Technicians with an orchestra may be required to set up the stage to the orchestra’s lay out, including chairs, music stands, sheet music, risers and rostra percussion and keyboards. They may also help musicians with large instruments such as harps and basses.

Experience as a sound engineer or programer is helpful, along with good knowledge of music hardware and software such as midi systems, computer music software, mixing consoles, and FX units.

Before an event a Backline Technician may need to help with unloading, then they will set up the equipment, including laptops and keyboards if necessary, and be responsible for tuning and testing. Rehearsals can be an opportunity to design and build the system, program sounds and save patches and songs where needed. During the performance a Backline Technician will need to maintain the equipment and keep the systems running. They need to be highly organized and are responsible for troubleshooting and providing spares for equipment if things go wrong. Experience in maintenance and in basic repair is useful. After the performance they will break down, pack and load.

Backline Technicians are usually self employed. They need to be flexible as hours can be long, new equipment can be added on a whim and things can go wrong. Some many accompany bands on tour and be required to work away from home. As part of the crew they need to be a good team member and prepared to help out with any aspect of the performance if necessary. Knowledge of playing an instrument or instruments at least to a basic standard is useful.

Experience counts for a lot, but a professional qualification in a related field, such as music technology, is also important. Keeping up to date with the new technology in the music industry is essential. Backline Technicians may develop other roles during their career, such as tour manager, or become involved in the management side of the business.

On a touring concert or theatrical production, the drum tech is solely responsible for drums and other percussion instruments and related accessories.

He or she is tasked with loading in instruments before show and building the kit to the specifications of the musician; this includes miking the kit and tuning the instruments. Backstage, the drum technician installs and operates an electronics rig generally consisting of power conditioners, an audio interface, synthesizer modules, a sampling module, and a headphone amp. Audio software like AudioDesk, Propellerhead Reason, and other plug-ins are run through a CPU and/or laptop computer. This rig is rack-mounted in two or more road cases that live offstage with the drum tech’s workbox, which carries replacement instrument parts, tools, and expendables.

During sound check, the drum tech will work closely with the monitor engineer and front of house engineer to set appropriate levels for the kit and percussion instruments, and make any last adjustments to the rig as directed by the musician. Drums may need to be tuned or tweaked more than once before a show, as humidity can rob a kit of tension in just a few hours. In any downtime, the tech tends to repairs and regular maintenance, and may be placing calls to order parts while trolling the craft services table backstage.

While in show, the drum tech’s attention stays constant on the electronics rig and musician on stage; if a drummer breaks a head or hardware jumps loose, the tech must be Johnny-on-the-spot to make the repair and get the show back on track. After the audience has left the building and the band returns to the tour bus, the drum tech packs up the gear and strikes the instruments.

A Guitar Technician is a member of a music ensemble’s road crew who maintains and sets up the musical equipment for one or more guitarists during a concert tour. Depending on the type and size of band, the guitar tech may be responsible for stringing, tuning, and adjusting electric guitars and acoustic guitars, and maintaining and setting up guitar amplifiers and other related electronic equipment such as effect pedals.

Once the guitar equipment has been set up onstage, the guitar tech does a soundcheck to ensure that the equipment is working well. If there are any problems, the guitar tech will replace or repair the faulty components or equipment. Since guitar techs need to soundcheck the instruments and amplifiers, they must have basic guitar-playing skills, a musical “ear” for tuning, and a familiarity with the way guitars, amplifiers, and effect pedals are supposed to sound in the style of music of their band.

Guitar techs learn their craft either “on the job”, by working in a range of music, sound engineering, and instrument repair jobs; by completing a guitar repair program at a college or lutherie school; or from a combination of these two routes. The salaries and conditions of work for guitar techs vary widely, depending on whether a guitar tech is working for a minor or regional touring bar band or a major international touring act.

Keyboard technicians, often referred to as piano technicians, technologists or tuners, adjust and repair pianos. Keyboard technicians can own their own business or work for universities, large orchestras or piano manufacturers. A few academic programs in piano technology and repair exist through technical schools and universities.

Due to the size of the instrument, keyboard technicians often work independently, visiting customers’ homes, churches or concert halls. They adjust the parts within the instruments, primarily the strings and the action, to ensure the piano is properly tuned and working optimally.

Keyboard technicians are trained to identify mechanical problems in pianos and fix them. They can improve the sound and touch of the instrument using industry tools. They could also offer reconditioning and refurbishing services for used pianos. Keyboard technicians usually need to know how to work on multiple types of pianos, such as upright, grand or square instruments.

The recording studio technician is primarily concerned with maintenance and repair of electronic equipment, including cables, microphones, and amps. Depending on the individual’s range of expertise, he or she may also be tasked with caring for instruments in the studio’s inventory and performing repairs like bridge replacements on guitars or changing out drum heads.

The studio technician works closely with in-house recording engineers and staff to regularly inspect gear for damage and wear, and will respond to immediate needs for troubleshooting and replacement of equipment during recording sessions. It is the studio tech’s responsibility to ensure that the tool shop is properly stocked with replacement parts and necessary expendables—you can never have too many guitar strings, heat shrink tubes, or microphone RCA transformers.

For major repairs or items under warranty, it is the technician’s job to contact the manufacturer to schedule a field technician or arrange to ship the equipment.

A Wiring Technician is responsible for setting up and/or operating audio and video equipment including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. A Wiring Tech may also set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems.

The theatre manager is a business manager responsible for managing a theater and its staff.

A Theatre Teacher teaches acting principles and techniques to individuals or groups. This position can be responsible for teaching enunciation, diction, voice development, and dialects, voice exercises, speech drills, explanation, lectures, and improvisation. A Theatre Teacher also discusses and demonstrates vocal and body expression to teach acting styles, character development, and personality projection.

A Tour Manager helps to organize the administration for a schedule of appearances of a musical group (band) or artist at a sequence of venues (a concert tour). In general, road managers handle small to medium-sized tours, and tour managers are used on large-scale tours.

A Tour, Production Assistant can refer to many different technical positions, such as Stage Tech, Instrument Tech, or Roadie, all of which play key roles in the production side of a tour.

The primary duty of the Venue Assistant is to assist in all operations of the venue. A Venue Assistant’s responsibilities can include booking and marketing the venue, as well as the overall maintenance of the facility. A venue must operate year round, so the venue assistant must help keep the space in good working condition not only during a performance, but on off nights as well.

The primary duty of the Venue Director is to oversee all operations of the venue. This includes the management of all staff, the oversight of all procedures and the troubleshooting of any problems. A venue must operate year round, so the venue manager must keep the space in good working condition not only during a performance, but on off nights as well.

While some venues have events booked by promoters, the Venue Director ensures those promoters are aware of the venue and will use it for their events. In some cases, s/he interacts with talent agents directly to bring events into the space.

The Venue Director is often responsible for marketing the venue to the community. His or her job is to make sure that the populace is aware of the venue and knows what events are coming up. While getting talent in to perform opens the door to profit, the venue needs paying patrons to come to the shows. The Venue Director must get the venue into the consciousness of the public.

The Venue Director can also be responsible for setting a yearly financial budget and then maintaining this budget. S/he must be aware of all costs and revenues that affect the way that the space does business.

Voice-over (also known as off-camera or off-stage commentary) is a production technique where a voice—that is not part of the narrative (non-diegetic)—is used in a radio, television production, filmmaking, theatre, or other presentations.
The voice-over may be spoken by someone who appears elsewhere in the production or by a specialist voice actor. It is pre-recorded and placed over the top of a film or video and commonly used in documentaries or news reports to explain information.

An Web Producer oversees the making of content for websites and other online properties. Responsibilities include creating, editing and arranging the text, video, audio, images and other materials that may be included on a website. Web Producers define and maintain the character of a website, as opposed to running it from a technical standpoint.

A Website Designer is responsible for the development and design of major and minor web applications.

A Web Designer working within the music industry creates digital tools for artists to grow their online presence. From UGC driven websites, to viral tools, to rich-media banners and everything in between, a Web Designer designs and builds tools that ensure an artist maximises their presence across a myriad of platforms.

A Writer, or Journalist, seeks out news and brings it to the public as quickly as possible. This position aims to present stories in a clear, engaging style. A journalist may: attend press launches, courts, council meetings and other events, interview people by phone or in person, respond to tip-offs, calls and news releases, record notes in shorthand or on tape and write stories up on computer.

Besides the pressures of working to deadline and getting stories out ahead of the competition, journalists must keep their stories balanced, fair and lawful.

Long and unpredictable hours are common in journalism. Journalists generally work 39 hours a week, but they may work shifts including early starts, nights and some weekends. They have to travel to where the news is, and may sometimes work outdoors.

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